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3 votes

Does AN 3.47 refer to only single standalone sankhara?

All conditioned phenomena are a result of conditional combination, and all the constituents are still made up of combination and so on. The law of impermanence of all conditional phenomena applies at ...
SacrificialEquation's user avatar
3 votes

To what extent does right view deny mother and father?

As I understand it, the mind of the enlightened is a superset of all the points of view, not a subset (nor an empty set). This is why it is called omniscience or "the knowledge of all modes/...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
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2 votes

Why are Concepts not Impermanent?

the way in which the question is formulated is non-sense. concepts are mental constructs, sankhara. and all constructs, material and mental, are impermanent, sabbe sankhara anicca. from a buddhist ...
john-doe's user avatar
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2 votes

Why are Concepts not Impermanent?

To my understanding, only two things are not impermanent. The first is Nibbana, based on Ud 8.1 and Ud 8.3. The second is the three marks of existence, based on AN 3.136. For other concepts - let's ...
ruben2020's user avatar
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2 votes

Do "conditioned" and "conventional" mean the same thing in Buddhism?

I think "conditioned" means that things exist or not depending on certain conditions, for example: Sometimes it rains and sometimes it doesn't, depending on atmospheric conditions. ...
ChrisW's user avatar
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2 votes

To what extent does right view deny mother and father?

The noble right view of MN117 doesn't talk about parents. There is no "my" mother and "my" father, without the self ("me"). Whose mother and father are they? They are ...
ruben2020's user avatar
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2 votes

To what extent does right view deny mother and father?

Fair warning: my take on this is not in alignment with any of the traditional interpretations. That said: It has been clear to me since reading MN 117 right after reading the Upanisads that the ...
Linda Blanchard's user avatar
2 votes

Is this noble right view? - "There is no mother or father, without the self"

The Zen story titled "Is That So?" (I suppose you know it) suggests that it's possible to 'function' as a parent, filling the needs of the child, without especial attachment to that child ...
ChrisW's user avatar
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1 vote

Does AN 3.47 refer to only single standalone sankhara?

To be honest, I don't think there are any standalone sankhara. The Theravada Abhidhamma does list out fundamental elements, upon which other composite elements are made of. The four great elements (...
ruben2020's user avatar
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1 vote

Does AN 3.47 refer to only single standalone sankhara?

Yes, I suppose a being is indeed capable of arising, ceasing, and changing, but that's valid within a certain context. If one has realized a more decoupled existence, then it wouldn't make sense to ...
blue_ego's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

Is the conventional existence of 'a being' just an agreement?

This question is what is the meaning of 'convention' ... and the question is 'does it just mean agreement?' from The Dhamma Theory. Philosophical Cornerstone of the Abhidhamma by Y. Karunadasa: The ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
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1 vote

To what extent does right view deny mother and father?

The mundane right view partakes only of merit (and not Nibbana). The supramundane right view does not deny the mundane right view but simply ceases to have attachment/ripening in the acquisitions ...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
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1 vote

To what extent does right view deny mother and father?

The full 'View' passage from that sutra list three kinds of view: Wrong view, which denies mother and father (among other things) Tainted right view, accepts mother and father (among other things) ...
Ted Wrigley's user avatar
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1 vote

Why is speaking about the conventional self in this life ok, but speaking about the conventional self in past and future lives forbidden?

I must read the entire question later. However, to answer the title of the question: the Pali suttas have a number of examples of speaking about the 'conventional self' in past and future lives (eg. ...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

Do "conditioned" and "conventional" mean the same thing in Buddhism?

Convention doesn't mean imaginary. It simply means that it is defined that way by consensus. For e.g. an assemblage of parts like wheel, axle etc. is called a chariot. An assemblage of bun, patty, ...
ruben2020's user avatar
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