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Karma is not something one accumulates; this question gets asked so often because, as you say, there is a misconception of it being a 'a solid, substantial' entity. Karma is volition (intention is a bad translation, IMO), or in abhidhamma, the seven javana citta present in an ordinary mind process (i.e. every moment of experience). All this means is that ...


7

There are two main interpretations of how karma is accumulated. In Sarvastivada branch of philosophy, past actions can be directly related to new consequences, because fundamentally "everything exists" and only the modus of time changes. As things aren't losing the status of existence, they can cause new things. There is a special additional property (...


5

Imagine you were looking for Nirvana, Enlightenment, Liberation - whatever you want to call it. As a rational man you are, you would think logically: Regardless of what Nirvana actually is (whatever it is), could it be that once I attain it, it would somehow end or expel me against my will? Could it be taken away from me? If it were that way, it would not be ...


4

All compounded and/ or conditioned things are impermanent or changing. This applies to the five aggregates, physical objects, matter, energy, physical space, time, most mental concepts and ideas etc. All matter can be broken down to energy. Energy can be converted to matter. That we know from Einstein's E=mc2. Matter can convert into different forms and so ...


2

While habits are part of the workings of karma, it is not reasonable to say that what you described (habit to fight leads to beating) is Buddhist notion of karma. It may be correct other way around, though—some unwholesome karma is ripening while you exercise habit to fight. Karma is similar to idiom "you reap what you sow" but with some added complexity. ...


2

Because the mind is an informational (~representational) phenomenon, subjective experience arises as a with-feedback-process of converting signs into their interpretations. Dukkha is an experience of unresolvable contradiction somewhere in the stream of interpretation. This condition requires a basis (some sort of internalized framework, model, a set of ...


2

I think that most traditions would say that Nirvana (or Nibbana in Pali) is not created. People wouldn't say, "I'm doing Nirvana" either. It can't be defined by words in the sense that you can give the words to someone else and they can make Nirvana by following or understanding the words. Some would even object to saying it is "realized"....


2

I'll give the answer according to the Madhyamaka which is notably different from some of the answers given according to the Theravada above. What is the difference between a "conditioned thing" and an "unconditioned thing"? A compounded thing is an object known by an awareness that is produced and functions. An uncompounded thing is ...


1

The burning of a fire produces flames, it is dependent on fuel & supportive conditions, burning is conditioned. The extinguishment of flames depends on the exhaustion of fuel and requisite conditions for burning. We can say that the cessation is conditioned by the process of burning and exhaustion of fuel. However extinguishment is not a thing among ...


1

In Buddhism, Conditional and Unconditional are discussed in context of dukkha vs peace. Dukkha is a painful feeling of wrongness, arising whenever there's a clash between your expectation and your actual experience. Peace is experienced when there's no such clash. Now, when you cling, you cling to Conditional, therefore your peace gets conditional. When the ...


1

Nirvana is a non-affirming negation. Uncompounded space is a great example of something that exists (ie., it can be known) and is also a non-affirming negation and is a helpful illustration. There are two different concepts that are often labeled by the word "space" and get confused together: Compounded space is the vacuum between material things. ...


1

There are three feelings: DN34:1.4.11: sukhā vedanā, dukkhā vedanā, adukkhamasukhā vedanā. DN34:1.4.11: pleasant, painful, and neutral. Sukhā vedanā (e.g., "joy of sex") is prone to relishing which leads to suffering. MN1:172-194.26: Because he has understood that relishing is the root of suffering, How then should we practice? DN34:1.2.5: ...


1

How does this meaning point towards "the end of suffering"? It implies that something (a dhamma) that is non-self, and which is non-created or not 'fabricated' -- i.e. nibanna -- is neither anicca or dukkha. See also this topic -- What is the basis? -- where I asked whether for example non-remorse might be permanent. I thought that especially the ...


1

Approaching causal and effectual reliance through "times" Past, Present, and Future are the three times. Future, Past, and Present equally depend on each other. If you try and draw a triangle with only one line or two lines, it is impossible. All three need to be in place for the totality of "time." In this way, it might be possible to reason more ...


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