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OP: What is the difference between domanassa & dukkha? There are many classifications of feelings: Vedanā (Feeling) According to the 5-fold classification, a distinction is made between mental and physical pain and pleasure. Vedanā (Feeling) In this classification, physical pain (Kāyika dukkha) is called simply dukkha and mental pain (cetasika ...


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An enlightened mind has eradicated the fetters that bound that mind with wandering around with suffering born from ignorance and craving. What kind of craving? In the Discourse of the Setting in Motion the Wheel of Dhamma (SN 56.11), the Buddha said this about the kind of desires than bind to suffering and dissatisfaction: "And this, monks, is the noble ...


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If and when a lay-follower attains arahant-ship, he or she has to either enter the Order that very day or else must attain parinibbàna. This is a Dhammata. This is conformity to the Dhammaniyāma – a general rule in Dhamma. This is discussed in the Milindapanha, which is a set of three Buddhist books that records the dialogues between the Indian monk ...


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OP: Are these two Sutra/Sutta equivalent but different versions? Yes, I think so. According to SuttaCentral, SA 288 and SN 12.67 are equivalent. I could find "三蘆立於空地" from your quote inside SuttaCentral's SA 288, so I guess it is the same. OP: If they are equivalent Sutra/Sutta, which is more reliable? Or, more accurate? SuttaCentral links the Chinese ...


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The Sila becomes higher depending on your knowledge of the virtues/benefits of it. The Sila becomes higher depending on how focused you are when you are keeping them. In other words, Sila becomes higher depending on your Samadhi & Panna. That's why the Sila of the Buddha is higher than anyone else's. The Lord did not use the flowers offered to him....


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Is wanting to do something = desire ? Abhidhamma... Thinking to do can be wholesome, unwholesome, or neither wholesome nor unwholesome. Thinking to attach can be unwholesome only. When one thinks to eat, he can eat by wholesome, unwholesome, or neither wholesome nor unwholesome. His mind is unwholesome by desiring in eating, wanting to eat more and ...


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Is wanting to do something = desire ? Not really. Wanting to do something is a thought process. In Buddhism, desire (Taṇhā) refers to greed or craving pleasure, material goods, and immortality, all of which are wants that can never be satisfied as the world is impermanent in nature and it is always subjected to change. This causes suffering. People ...


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My person is not sure about "on that very day" and sees the "seven days", mentioned in the Suttas more resasonable. As quoted by Upasaka Saptha Visuddhi in the anicent discussion, the relations within a householder-life, the regards are to weak to supporting, now having perfect virtue, since it's not likely that he may be proper offered what is required to ...


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A lay person who becomes an Arahant must become a monk or they will die? This is not by the Buddha but by Bhikkhu Nagasena in the Milindapanha (refer to Wikipedia). Bhikkhu Nagasena was the monk who gave the illogical & false analogy of the candle flame to explain reincarnation. Can anyone explain what this teaching means? I suppose it means when ...


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The rest of the sutta talks about pairs of things e.g. ... From the cessation of name-&-form comes the cessation of the six sense media. From the cessation of the six sense media comes the cessation of contact. From the cessation of contact comes the cessation of feeling. From the cessation of feeling comes the cessation of craving. From the cessation ...


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In my understanding of Mahayana doctrine, the term namarupa does not refer to individual's mind-and-body. In my opinion, this traditional Theravadin interpretation is incorrect. Instead, namarupa means "name-form" - meaning "a concept of form", "an idea of form" - referring to our subjective representations of external and internal phenomena, as well as the ...


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Buddhas sila is the best sila Monks were not allowed to use those fancy things because that would distract them from going in the path to nirvana. When someone achieved nirvana, there is no person anymore , thus there is no rules or regulations. They just exist , with the best sila in the world. Because they have stopped their desires. There's nothing ...


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