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life is bad, but we can end suffering in some distant end goal It may sound facile, but if the cause of suffering is craving, then acknowledging that, and finding a means to end craving, would be a special way overcome "suffering". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_Noble_Truths However, if suffering just means "life is bad", rather than ...


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From the conversation you had with your brother I assume(may be wrong assumption) he is agnostic. He seems to have a strong sense of attachment to life. Maybe he is not yet seeing the vicissitudes of life. Every one of us is wired with innate ignorance and it is easy to have a blind eye to the suffering that is happening all around.And also it is extremely ...


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Some religions offer an end to suffering only after death, in heaven, provided that you're a believer and have fulfilled the requirements of those religions. But in Buddhism, when you look deep into the original teachings of the Buddha, he provided methods to reduce sufferings in the here and now, even for a lay person, who is not a professional full time ...


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That is certainly the formula for Christianity. Christianity is a mental virus. Adaptations that help it infect new hosts, or keep the host from leaving (being cured) are propagated into the next generation. Any mutations that set a host free, would have to set them free of Christianity too, so such mutations aren't evolutionarily advantageous. All religions ...


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This question deals with soteriology — the theory of salvation advocated by a religion or philosophy — and soteriology is never quite as simple and straightforward as one might like. We can discuss the differences in soteriology between Buddhist and Abrahamic worldviews. But if we do we have to recognize that mystical sects interpret soteriological ...


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I like Stephen Batchelor's emphasis on the four noble truths as to be actively realised, rather than to be taken as dogmatic declarations. He adds the verbs I've italicised: understand There is suffering (or anguish, or unsatisfactoriness) (& it's one of the three marks of existence) realise There are causes of suffering giving up (attachments that cause ...


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Your brother projects his own definition of suffering onto Buddhism. I've read that the Buddha said something close to this: "There are these three kinds of suffering [dukkhata]. What three? Suffering which is pain & misery [dukkhadukkhata], suffering which is the formations [sankharadukkhata], suffering associated with change [viparinamadukkhata]. ...


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For me, the Buddha’s great insight about suffering had a very practical goal in this life—not some future one. I see this goal being confused with the accomplishment of the enlightenment and total realization of the Buddha. That takes much time and patient dedication which I won’t speak about. I feel that it is important to point out a couple of obvious ...


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Buddhism has diagnosed all suffering as possessive attachment to the five components of life (body, feelings, perception, mental formations & consciousness) as 'self'. Buddhism has also diagnosed the primary cause or fuel behind this attachment is craving. Therefore, ask your brother: "Can suffering exist without self-attachment & craving?" ...


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