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For me, the Buddha’s great insight about suffering had a very practical goal in this life—not some future one. I see this goal being confused with the accomplishment of the enlightenment and total realization of the Buddha. That takes much time and patient dedication which I won’t speak about. I feel that it is important to point out a couple of obvious ...


5

How is it that everyone's cocksure of their own religion or spiritual path? I'm not sure they are. One of the mottos from the Christian canon is, as a prayer, "I believe; help my unbelief!" (Mark 9:24) -- which I read as an admission of not being cocksure. Perhaps Buddhists too aren't "cocksure", instead I think the canon keeps tells ...


4

OP: So to sum up my question, how is it that everybody is cocksure or their own religion? The quoted suttas below say that an unenlightened person says certain teachings are true, or holds to views, because of clinging, because he depends on them. Due to clinging, it's hard to let go and see other perspectives. These and other suttas in Snp 4 show how an ...


4

Sine you've asked a not-exactly-Buddhist question, I'm going to begin with a daoist observation and work my way back to Buddhism. Chapter 38 of the daodejing contains the following passage (variably translated): When the Dao is lost, people become good. When goodness is lost, people become moral. When morality is lost, people turn to ritual. Ritual is the ...


3

I want to address two aspects of this question. First, why is everyone so sure of his or her own path? I think the answer lies in the process of identification. This is in our nature, identification is even considered necessary to develop a personality when growing up. We can identify with a lot of things. With a person, a religion, a race, a gender, a ...


3

A disciple of the Buddha wouldn't quarrel around but just remember and know DN 1: Brahmajāla Sutta— The All-embracing Net of Views | The Brahmā Net, good householder and use struggles in the world just to increase efforts but Samvega.


2

While violence and destruction is strongly discouraged in Buddhism, it is ok for a ruler or government of a country that adheres to Buddhist principles, to establish police and armed forces to: protect and guard the people ensure peace ensure that justice prevails Please see Pali sutta quotes below. However, what about the hypothetical case of Buddhists ...


2

The Buddha discouraged being cocksure: MN38:14.1: “Pure and bright as this view is, mendicants, if you cherish it, fancy it, treasure it, and treat it as your own, would you be understanding how the Dhamma is similar to a raft: for crossing over, not for holding on?” MN38:14.2: “No, sir.” MN38:14.3: “Pure and bright as this view is, mendicants, if you don’t ...


1

From a Buddhist perspective, the Buddha and the dharma only "deals" in Truths. Buddh[ISM] is a mental construct created by "lesser" people (worldlings) The Buddha himself only explained the truth of suffering, the cause of suffering, cessation of suffering and the path to the cessation. Obviously then "lesser" people created ...


1

According to this Jainpedia page on Jain teachings on karma: The karmas accrued over a lifetime trap the soul in the cycle of births. The karmas mature by affecting the soul or the physical body of its next lifetime or birth. When the body dies, the soul is born in a different body, which is shaped by karmas from the previous birth and the ones before that. ...


1

Well if you're a Christian, then Christianity is always 100% right. If your Muslim, then Islam is always 100% right. It can't be otherwise. Your universe simply doesn't allow the possibility. It's written into the fabric of your existence like acceleration due to gravity in our physical universe. Why wouldn't you be cocksure if there's no other possible ...


1

This question deals with soteriology — the theory of salvation advocated by a religion or philosophy — and soteriology is never quite as simple and straightforward as one might like. We can discuss the differences in soteriology between Buddhist and Abrahamic worldviews. But if we do we have to recognize that mystical sects interpret soteriological ...


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I like Stephen Batchelor's emphasis on the four noble truths as to be actively realised, rather than to be taken as dogmatic declarations. He adds the verbs I've italicised: understand There is suffering (or anguish, or unsatisfactoriness) (& it's one of the three marks of existence) realise There are causes of suffering giving up (attachments that cause ...


1

It may be that you've misunderstood the Christian sola fide doctrine -- I think that at least some Christian sects would hold that relatively blameless behaviour is evidence of salvation or grace. Still, perhaps you're right -- the table in that Wikipedia article says that the (specifically) Lutheran belief is ... Justification is separate from and occurs ...


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Yes and no. No: The term “sin” does not have any special connotation in Buddhism, as it has in major theistic religions like Christianity, Judaism, or Islam. In all these religions, the general belief is that sins are individual actions which are contrary to the will of God or to the will of the Supreme Being. The karmic principle is based on action and ...


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