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For me, the Buddha’s great insight about suffering had a very practical goal in this life—not some future one. I see this goal being confused with the accomplishment of the enlightenment and total realization of the Buddha. That takes much time and patient dedication which I won’t speak about. I feel that it is important to point out a couple of obvious ...


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Buddhism has diagnosed all suffering as possessive attachment to the five components of life (body, feelings, perception, mental formations & consciousness) as 'self'. Buddhism has also diagnosed the primary cause or fuel behind this attachment is craving. Therefore, ask your brother: "Can suffering exist without self-attachment & craving?" ...


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This question deals with soteriology — the theory of salvation advocated by a religion or philosophy — and soteriology is never quite as simple and straightforward as one might like. We can discuss the differences in soteriology between Buddhist and Abrahamic worldviews. But if we do we have to recognize that mystical sects interpret soteriological ...


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I like Stephen Batchelor's emphasis on the four noble truths as to be actively realised, rather than to be taken as dogmatic declarations. He adds the verbs I've italicised: understand There is suffering (or anguish, or unsatisfactoriness) (& it's one of the three marks of existence) realise There are causes of suffering giving up (attachments that cause ...


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To me prayers and meditation are of the same tree but different branches. This is what works best for me. I usually start my meditation by concentrating of the breath for 10 minutes, and then I move onto releasing all parts of the body for 10 minutes. Then I move onto prayers in which I start with people I know (and know their current issues) and pray in my ...


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