34

Buddhism teaches that all misbeliefs(beliefs that block the path to Nibbana) are variations of 2 fundamental misbeliefs. Sasvatha Vada - Eternalism Uchcheda Vada - Nihilism What Jesus preached falls under Sasvatha Vada. Hinduism and Islam are also in the same category. So he couldn't have been even an average Buddhist teacher, let alone a Buddha. Besides, ...


28

As a preliminary, there are two issues to deal with first that can hinder a search for linkages between Jesus and Buddhism. First, it's important to note that the religion associated with Jesus -- Christianity -- is just as forked and complex as the "religion" commonly known as Buddhism. To insiders in both, there are many differences, both significant and ...


27

Why is it that Buddhism never compiled a reasonably concise set of canonical texts like the Bible? One could equally ask, "why didn't Christianity compile a lengthy and diverse set of canonical texts like the Tripiṭaka?" The thing is, Buddhism does have a canonical set of texts that are widely viewed by all major Buddhist traditions as canonical (as far as ...


18

As someone who was born into Orthodox Christian faith, has been baptized, attended church occasionally, has read full Bible, both New and Old Testament (BTW the Orthodox version of which includes 11 more "books" than the Protestant, 4 more than the Catholic), who has high respect for the teaching of Christ, appreciation of Father, and deep connection with ...


11

I think it is mistaken to think that Christianity just has the Bible as it's authority and everything else is dispensable. That idea only showed up at the time of the protestant reformation, and before that, the writings of the Church fathers (which are quite voluminous) and books on theology were regarded as an absolutely essential part of Christian ...


8

Okay, for the purpose of providing an answer, I've gone to this site: http://www.antiochian.org/whatorthodoxbelieve which, correct me if I'm wrong, seems to present the views of the Eastern Orthodox church, from their POV. The only thing I can see as being a problem, would be the phrase, taken a bit out of context from Timothy: "From such withdraw ...


8

If you are "a faithful believer in Buddha's teachings" you have missed his point entirely. You should not believe a single thing. Instead, your own experience should lead you to your own conclusions. This is what Buddha left behind. Techniques for waking up, so that you may dissolve into pure experience, as did he and countless others. Only you can save ...


7

I think when discussing this kind of thing it is to start seeing connections where there are none. However I would like to give a more positive response to the question. If I can address this side of the question Can anyone tell me where Jesus fits into Buddhism? Thich Nhat Hanh wrote a lovely book about the parallels between the Buddha and Jesus called ...


7

There's a Wikipedia article here about the word "faith" in Christianity; which begins, The word "faith", translated from the Greek πιστις (pi'stis), was primarily used in the New Testament with the Greek perfect tense and translates as a noun-verb hybrid; which is not adequately conveyed by the English noun. An explanation of what the Greek perfect tense ...


7

For me, the Buddha’s great insight about suffering had a very practical goal in this life—not some future one. I see this goal being confused with the accomplishment of the enlightenment and total realization of the Buddha. That takes much time and patient dedication which I won’t speak about. I feel that it is important to point out a couple of obvious ...


6

Faith is a central concept to Christianity, but like Buddhism, Christianity has different branches and the views differ somewhat in each. The wikipedia article on Faith in Christianity gives a fair summary of some of these views. The Original (Ancient Greek) word that is translated to 'faith' in English versions of the New Testament is: pistis ( πίστις ), ...


6

Why is it that Buddhism never compiled a reasonably concise set of canonical texts like the Bible. Buddhism itself has universal beliefs such as the 4 Noble Truths, the Eightfold Path and the notion of going for refuge. To me then it doesn't seem unreasonable that there could have been a Buddhist Bible that complied these central beliefs in the same way as ...


6

(I'm writing this in the spirit of providing a factual answer instead of preaching how people should strive to get along by seeing similarities in religions that may or may not be there.) No. That's a different religion. We search for commonality amongst world religions so we don't have to hate on each other, but the religions are different. To quote two ...


6

There's no official stance towards Jesus as far as I know, in any tradition. The reason is that these traditions were established well before Christianity's existence was even known. Christianity took thousand of years to reach East Asia, for instance. But from my personal point of view (which is a Japanese Pure Land point of view) I will say that I believe ...


5

In response to your question, may I ask what are we saving ourselves from? Samsara is an endless (and beginningless) grinding cycle where all beings are being agonized by myriad forms of suffering (Dukkha). However, Samsara, and even higher realms of existence are illusionary, how can one be saved from an illusion? Here is an excellent analogy I read from ...


5

Your question is on how to show that one is offering help or support. But I'm assuming that what you really meant is how to actually help or support and not just show that one is helping or supporting. Since Buddhism does not acknowledge the existence of a God or Supreme Being to whom one can pray, prayer in the sense practised in other religions may not be ...


4

simply answer is No, Jesus is considered as son of God. Buddha was a human his parents are all human and he never reborn. All Buddhas have certain features that are directly used to differentiate a Buddha from others. Those features will clear out your doubts. And the "Buddha" is a kind of designation, not a person. I found a great answer here but its ...


4

This question is answered in the Brahmajala Sutta of the Dighaikaya. BUDDHA ON GOD There comes a time, monks, sooner or later after a long period, when this world contracts. At a time of contraction, beings are mostly reborn in the Abhassara Brahma world. And there they dwell, mind-made, feeding on delight, self-luminous, moving through space, ...


4

Apparently Pascal is aware of the same thing that the Buddha was aware of before he became enlightened: i.e. a view of reality which was the actual incentive for Gautama to look for enlightenment, asking something like, "How can I be happy, even as a king, when illness and death are inevitable?" This description of the "human condition" ...


4

One possible reason why christianism has been more reluctant to add new texts into their canon is that it is a profetic religion, that is, a religion based on revelation assumed to come directly from a superior or ultimate entity (their God). Buddhism would be a "mystical religion" based on humans accessing the ultimate truth directly. Christians (or Jews or ...


4

Consider how the Bible arose. Four historical persons played key roles in bringing the Christian Bible to you. They were Irenaeus, Bishop of Lyon, who thundered against any who did not accept exclusively the four gospels as divinely inspired; the 1st century ascetic Saint Jerome who translated Hebrew and Greek texts into the Latin Vulgate Bible; Johannes ...


4

the parable of the good samaritan The parable of the Good Samaritan isn't about "special responsibility to those we have injured". In the parable: The "certain man" was injured by robbers (who stripped and beat him) The injured man was ignored by a priest and a Levite The Samaritan showed compassion and acted as if he had a special ...


3

Main cause of your problems are when you come in contact a sensation arise and you react due to our delusional perceptions which proliferates other sedation to which we react. You liberation is being non reactive to the sensation and reducing pre conditioned reaction. The Buddha cannot subdue perception of another being or indefinitely influence the ...


3

Mu. Division is violence. The mainstream of any religion tend to be pretty hard-core about the uniqueness of their belief system because they derive an identity from it, and most people will even share the food on their plate, but not their sense of identity. This is the basis for all religious conflict. "All the adjectives and nouns that we use to ...


3

Within my own experience of this, I think it is entirely down to personal opinion. Throughout my upbringing, I was very lucky to be brought up in a country with so many temples and religions that there was hardly any discrimination and a huge encouragement to take part in celebrations. I have always been taught that each religion is equal, and that they ...


3

The answer depends on exactly what one means by Buddhism and Christianity since whether we like it or not those things are not precisely defined by anything like a universal authority. Even within each concept, there are huge differences. One could equally well ask if one can follow both Theravada and Mahayana, or both Catholicism and Protestantism. That ...


3

I think it is possible to be both anything, as long as you are open and prepared for your definitions of both Buddhist and Christian to change and evolve with time. If you are stuck in place, then that would not work, even for someone who is "just" Buddhist. In my experience it is kind of a useless pursuit to find "similarities" between religions. Let's ...


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