9

Someone else will answer this better than me, but I'll get the ball rolling. Chan is the form of Buddhism that came to dominate Buddhist life in China up to the time of the communist revolution. It was a lot of meditation, mixed in with a lot of Pure Land Buddhism, scholarship and the whole gammut of Buddhist practices, including prostrations, repentance, ...


8

the relative simplicity of Zen and the baroque belief systems of the other Mahayana traditions Are we talking about style? Yes, the records of the Zen masters resemble the style of the Zhuangzi more than they resemble the style of the Avatamsaka Sutra. But we should be more interested in content when evaluating where a tradition belongs. - The Sutras are ...


6

At this point I venture to say that the school one picks is largely irrelevant. It's much more about the teacher's ability to connect the map of the teaching with the jungle of your immediate living experience. Once you see how the two relate, you can start making progress. As was said in Kalama Sutta: Come Kalamas. Do not go upon what has been acquired ...


5

I would recommend you to pick the tradition closest to the original teachings of the Buddha and try to find a good teacher within that tradition. Trying many traditions would probably lead you to spiritual confusion than progress. You can discover a good Dhamma teacher by evaluating the following criteria Are his teachings sensible, skillful and praised ...


5

The Dhamma of the Buddha is the right dhamma teacher; as stated in the Pali suttas. I have set forth the Dhamma without making any distinction of esoteric and exoteric doctrine; there is nothing, Ananda, with regard to the teachings that the Tathagata holds to the last with the closed fist of a teacher who keeps some things back... Therefore, Ananda, be ...


4

You can't really say No to "Do Buddhist Believe in Fortune Tellers?" Because The Buddha himself had the ability to tell someone's fortune and future.He didn't do it for money of course.But he could tell what would happen to people. There were times where he knew that they had to listen to the Dhamma soon because their death was imminent.He could tell their ...


4

The Udayi Sutta (AN 5.159) describes the five qualities in one qualified to teach the Dhamma: "It's not easy to teach the Dhamma to others, Ananda. The Dhamma should be taught to others only when five qualities are established within the person teaching. Which five? "(1) The Dhamma should be taught with the thought, 'I will speak step-by-step.' ...


3

It is classical Chinese written in part of Chinese character and part of Japanese kanji Character, it is still Chinese text, I can identify it because I am a Chinese speaker. Yes it is Lotus Sutra Kumārajīva and Yao Qin translated an ancient book "龜茲文本" to Chinese, that is Lotus Sutra I can only answer this, I have no information for the rest of questions


3

I've seen quite a few news reports that focus on the huge growth of Christianity in China so naively I would have expected that this would now have overtaken Buddhism. However this report states that The growth of Christianity is impressive, but Buddhist growth is extraordinary, especially with the country's history of official ideology of atheism ...


3

Within my own experience of this, I think it is entirely down to personal opinion. Throughout my upbringing, I was very lucky to be brought up in a country with so many temples and religions that there was hardly any discrimination and a huge encouragement to take part in celebrations. I have always been taught that each religion is equal, and that they ...


3

Here is a quote from the book "What Buddhists Believe" by Ven. K. Sri Dhammananda. The quote is from the chapter: "Fortune-Telling and Charms", p. 422-424: "ALTHOUGH Buddhism does not refute belief in deities, spirits, astrology and fortune-telling, the Buddha’s advice was that people should not be slaves to any of those forces. A good Buddhist can ...


3

Korean Seon and Chinese Chan both have distinctive styles and practices. Here is a detailed study of Korean Seon that will be selectively quoted to draw conclusions about differences between the two and zen in Japan. http://www.acmuller.net/articles/ogahae-oxford.html "...Thus, the well-ingrained custom of interpreting Korean Seon based on the models of ...


3

"Original Zen", it is said, was started as an act by Mahākāśyapa (one of the original 5 disciples of Gautama Shakyamuni. He gave a knowing look to Gautama when he held up a flower. The genealogy of Zen traces from that moment, to an Indian monk (Bodhidharma) who's master told him to go to China. That's the mythology anyway. For the full scholarly picture ...


3

There's only two Ch'an lines active in the West that I know of, the first one founded by Hsuan Hua. Its headquarters are in California. It has branch temples, for the West mainly in the US, listed on this page. The second is the Western Chan Fellowship, who actually list Xuyun in their lineage, and has branches in the US and Europe.


2

Good question. Most Buddhist teachers do advise us to try to ignore dreams and visions. Hard to do, sometimes. Still, in some places, they do place credence on dreams. During the Kalachakra Initiation, a 2 or 3-day affair, after the first day's teachings, the student is advised to try to remember his dream from that night. [http://www.berzinarchives.com/web/...


2

Okay I found the answer. It's from the "Sūtra of the Upāsaka Precepts" (Shansheng Jing). It was translated into Chinese in the 5th century. http://www.sutrasmantras.info/sutra33c.html This sutra has similarities to the older Sigalovada Sutta http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/dn/dn.31.0.ksw0.html (Ref comparing the UPS and Sigalovada: "Buddhism ...


2

In Chinese Buddhism, repentance has two elements. The first: One involves the rituals of confession in which we make offerings such as flowers and fruits to the Three Jewels as we sincerely confess and repent our sins. Through these rituals, we look honestly into our minds for the causes of our wrongdoings, sincerely accept responsibility for the harms we ...


2

Platform sutra describes 'non-symbolic repentance' as including sincere promise to never repeat faults in the future, and acknowledgement of our past faults, that are caused by defilements of mind (ignorance, pride, and envy), which we decide to clean off our thoughts for good.


2

I think that this kind of thinking is rather superficial. The essence of Zen is the teaching that all beings possess a Buddha nature, and that by seeing into one's true nature one attains enlightenment. None of this is a part of Daoism. In addition, a lot of the similarities between the two are also found in Buddhist Sutras. For example, the extensive use ...


2

This suggestion that Zen/Chan is Taoism tends to come from the Taoists/Chinese nationalists themselves rather than any real Chan teachings. I am from a Chinese Buddhist school of Chan lineage. Before becoming a practicing Buddhist I dabbled in self study of Taoist teachings. Since historical times, Chinese civilization due to it's great power with respect ...


2

I'm not a scholar of Chinese Buddhism, all I known is that the gradual enlightenment tradition was referred to as "The Northern School of Chan" and the sudden enlightenment got known as "The Southern School of Chan". Googling for these two terms turns up some useful references. Let's see what we can learn from these... Wikipedia articles on Chan Buddhism - ...


2

He never went. For he had no purpose. At least, that is what a Daoist perspective on the Koan would suggest as an "answer". And given that Chan (Zen) is in essence a Daoist expression of Buddhism, I think the response is likely correct. Novice Zen monks are often called Unsui(雲水) in Japan. It translates to Cloud, Water. The name pays homage to the Zen ...


2

This is a long-standing mystery, described in many Zen Koans. Here are two Koans from the Gateless Gate that mentions it: Kyogen said: "Zen is like a man hanging in a tree by his teeth over a precipice. His hands grasp no branch, his feet rest on no limb, and under the three another person asks him: `Why does Bodhidharma come to China from India?' If the ...


2

I tried to follow everything from the nissayamuccaka-course which I described in this answer, when I was still in a monk-hood by myself; and I had a low-quality teacher for about five years; before I found a perfect teacher from pa-auk forest monastery (this monastery also published other English-language Dharma articles here) who have all of the qualities ...


2

This is an extremely broad question, I will limit my response to Ch'an/Zen Buddhism. Starting in the earliest schools of Ch'an in Sung China, we find the practice of a stimulus/response ritual the Japanese call sassho. It usually (but not necessarily) takes the form of a question-answer dialog between master and student and is used to both invoke and verify ...


1

It appears this practice originated from Taoism, not from Buddhism. However, there is an account of hungry ghosts stories in Buddhism. (Petavattu) In Sri Lanka, we pass merits to departed relatives but there is no specific date for it.


1

What prompted the great BodhiDharma to go to China to spread his teachings- why not at home in the first place. Because he was a noble disciple who fulfilled the instruction of the Great Teacher: "Go forth for the good of the many, for the happiness of the many, out of compassion for the world, for the welfare, the good and the happiness of gods and ...


1

In this translation, the text quoted below exists about 10% of the way through the text, towards the end of the first chapter ("1. Purification of the Buddha-Field"), a few paragraphs before the start of the secod chapter ("2. Inconceivable Skill in Liberative Technique"): Thereupon, magically influenced by the Buddha, the venerable Sariputra had this ...


1

From the wiki page: All surviving schools of buddhist thought accept – "in common" – the existence of the first six primary consciousnesses (Sanskrit: vijñāna, Tibetan: རྣམ་ཤེས་, Wylie: rnam-shes).1 The internally coherent Yogācāra school associated with Maitreya, Asaṅga, and Vasubandhu, however, uniquely – or "uncommonly" – also posits the existence of ...


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