Hot answers tagged

6 votes

Have any Buddhist thinkers responded to the critique of the Brahma Sutras?

I think Nagarjuna's Mulamadhyamakakarika is the work you are looking for. Just like Brahma-sutras does not mention specific Buddhist sutras it debates with, Mulamadhyamakakarika does not mention ...
  • 55.8k
5 votes

What arguments are there for "karma" -- that the agent inevitably experiences the result of their actions?

UPDATE based on the edited question with a suggested definition of karma. While it is true that the Buddha taught that each and every volitional action has specific consequences this is most ...
  • 4,246
3 votes

What happens to a cause after it has generated an effect?

I think the right way to think about this, according to Mahayana Buddhism, is that it is our mind that delineates the spatiotemporal continuum and identifies a cause. In other words, things are not ...
  • 55.8k
3 votes

Have any Buddhist thinkers responded to the critique of the Brahma Sutras?

Here is the list of the Buddhist and Hindu Acaryas in chronological order based on their dates and who critiqued whom. Nāgārjuna(1st C.E) critiqued by Vātsyāyana (400 C.E) Vātsyāyana critiqued by ...
3 votes

"Free will" or just 'will' ?

The ego has survival instincts hardwired into our bodies. These survival tendencies are what give rise to greed, ignorance and hatred. This is what creates suffering. To be conscious of this process ...
3 votes

Are reasons causes?

When we ask someone "why do you do that?", we are asking for her/his reasons. This basically looks like to fulfil ones own curiosity. Our intellect is the sphere of our mind and our mind delights in ...
2 votes

Has anyone read Nagarjuna as claiming only that an effect is never its cause?

See "Mula-madhyamaka-karika" by Nagarjuna: Neither from itself nor from another, Nor from both, Nor without a cause, Does anything whatever, anywhere arise. Later Chandrakirti wrote ...
  • 1,495
2 votes

Does the effect make its cause?

The cause is not dependant on the effect. The effect is dependant on the cause. The concept of Śūnyatā does not mean nothingness. It just means being empty of a self and being empty of satisfaction ...
2 votes

Bad behavior (and therefore bad kamma?) due to physical ailments

In abhidhamma.- There are 4 type of minds: wholesome-root functional mind, good kamma. unwholesome-root functional mind, bad kamma. root's effect functional mind, kamma's fruit. rootless functional ...
  • 5,907
2 votes
Accepted

What arguments are there for "karma" -- that the agent inevitably experiences the result of their actions?

Personnal experience is a good way to learn. From what i understand, buddhism isn't based on blind faith, so experience is an excellent teacher in that sense. Although i won't quote any buddhist text,...
  • 153
2 votes

Why is continuity like "the light of a lamp"?

No. The light of a lamp is a well-known Buddhist metaphor for continuity of information-causation (what Nagarjuna refers to as "the divine"), since at least The Questions of King Milinda: --...
  • 55.8k
1 vote

Would you say the "dharma" explains "dharmas"

The term dhamma has multiple meanings in Buddhism. Dhamma is defined in the accesstoinsight.org glossary page as: dhamma [Skt. dharma]:(1) Event; a phenomenon in and of itself; (2) mental quality; (3)...
  • 34.2k
1 vote

What is the cause of suffering in Buddhism, is it wanting, craving, attachment, or something else?

Chief Bhadraka once asked the Buddha: SN42.11:1.3: “Please, sir, teach me the origin and cessation of suffering.” And the Buddha responded at length, eventually saying: SN42.11:2.10: ‘All the ...
  • 8,937
1 vote

What is the cause of suffering in Buddhism, is it wanting, craving, attachment, or something else?

If we get down to brass tacks, the root of the Buddhist problematic is the human ability to 'imagine otherwise'. Say (for a dumb example) that you're out on a date and you see someone and think: "...
  • 4,450
1 vote

The Simultaneity of Cause and Effect

Traditional Standard 日蓮仏教/ Nichiren Buddhism at Minobu Yama c.1280AD is about refinement and being kindly and nice and is quite based on The Teachings of The Buddha, & Guidance of 日蓮/ Nichiren ...
  • 259
1 vote

In Buddhism, is the effect ontologically independent of the cause?

in Madhyamika,the effect depends on the cause,wich one can say IS the effect because arising and Cessation do not occur.in Theravadan Kshanabhanga however,the effect is independant of the cause and ...
  • 297
1 vote

In Buddhism, is the effect ontologically independent of the cause?

No effects can arise without multiple causes. The causes can still be in state just possible to arise or may vanished long time ago. The causes can be unreality as well, knowing person, car, etc. But ...
  • 5,907
1 vote

Emptiness in mind and in reality

Subtleties... The concept of emptiness is a mental object that is predicated on other things. We only get to the concept of emptiness by seeing through and negating the fullness (meaningfulness) of ...
  • 4,450
1 vote

What arguments are there for "karma" -- that the agent inevitably experiences the result of their actions?

Looking at the Early Buddhist Texts (EBTs), we see: AN4.233:1.1: “Cattārimāni, bhikkhave, kammāni mayā sayaṃ abhiññā sacchikatvā paveditāni. AN4.233:1.1: “Mendicants, I declare these four kinds of ...
  • 8,937
1 vote

Is continuity just causation?

When we speak about causation we're used to thinking in terms of discrete entities interacting and causing distinct events. This is normal in materialistic view, ever obsessed with discreteness. ...
  • 55.8k
1 vote

How does cause depend on its effect?

Approaching causal and effectual reliance through "times" Past, Present, and Future are the three times. Future, Past, and Present equally depend on each other. If you try and draw a triangle with ...
  • 511
1 vote

Causation without causes

The Enlightened One taught that there is no cause or "creator" that was eternal or has immortality, such as; a soul or supreme being that was empirically knowable. The Buddha taught that there was ...
1 vote
Accepted

How does our inactions contribute to Karma?... For eg:How can you justify act of your cook killing an animal for your non buddhist guest?

I came to know His Holiness Dalai Lama serves his guests meat at his residency Yes but is the meat bought at the supermarket or he keeps animals to slaughter for food? If it's bought at a supermarket ...
  • 3,062
1 vote

How does our inactions contribute to Karma?... For eg:How can you justify act of your cook killing an animal for your non buddhist guest?

Is it dharma to ask your cook to kill an animal to serve your guest If Dalai Lama asks the cook to kill an animal, he violates the 1st precept and commits bad karma. If he asks the cook to just ...
1 vote

Have any Buddhist thinkers responded to the critique of the Brahma Sutras?

I have not found a single source that addresses the Brahma Sutras directly, but as Bakmoon says, it is possible to find references in texts regarding some of these points. It might be better to add ...
  • 34.2k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible