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Worrying, because of its obsession with self (i.e., "I won't finish") is a form or wrong mindfulness. Right mindfulness attends to what will help oneself and others (e.g., "What effort and action would be of value now?"). But you ask about the effects of worrying. These are listed starting here: AN10.114:9.1: Wrong mindfulness is a bad principle. Right ...


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Generally, worry is would be of and unwanted thing happening or a wanted thing not happening. A wanted thing generates craving and unwanted thing generates aversion. Dwelling on these states of mind continuously generates much negativity which makes you sad and depressed. If you do not act out by word or deed on the frustration created due to worry this ...


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Yes, you have misconstrued. Dependent Origination is about the origin of suffering (sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress & despair) rather than about the origin of the physical universe (refer to SN 12.2). Dependent Origination says the 1st cause for the origin of suffering is ignorance; for which no preceding cause can be found (refer to AN 10.61). In ...


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nothingness is nonexistent so there is the absurdity of referring to it as a functioning thing and an existing thing. also from the pov of substantial causes, mental factors such as intention are not main minds ie. consciousness/mind itself, meaning they cannot function as substantial cause for the production of a mind.


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The origin of this whole line of reasoning in Tibetan Buddhism comes from Dharmakirti's Pramanavarttika. There have been extensive commentaries and teachings on this from numerous great masters of Tibetan Buddhism. You can find commentaries on it from all the extant schools of Tibetan Buddhism. For an extensive set of discussions on this line of reasoning ...


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This is out of scope for Buddhism SE. This is more like a history question. The Buddhist texts describe Charvaka as being materialist. Sarva-Darsana-Samgraha describes Charvaka as being both materialist and hedonist, but some scholars (especially Bhattacharya) say there's insufficient evidence to claim that Charvaka was hedonist. The explanation of the ...


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Traditional Standard 日蓮仏教/ Nichiren Buddhism at Minobu Yama c.1280AD is about refinement and being kindly and nice and is quite based on The Teachings of The Buddha, & Guidance of 日蓮/ Nichiren Daishi, His writings, and careful consideration of The Lotus Sutra. Nichiren Buddhism is about the present and future, yet doesnot discount the past, and Nichiren ...


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The very notion of anatta implies there is no intention that originated from an independent standalone self. Dependent origination applies to all mental and physical processes. You eat because you're hungry, yes. Could you have decided to practise the teachings of the Dhamma if you have never encountered it? Of course not. Some people come to the ...


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Every inside has an outside. Can you truly say that one has hunger because of only things outside without anything on the inside? Can a rock be hungry? Can the vacuum of space be hungry? There must be something on the inside which is part of hunger, or else it is a thing which is experienced by every part of existence equally. On the other side, can an ...


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Yes. It's true that not everything is caused by karma. Some things are caused by other reasons, like the weather. The Sivaka Sutta talks about this. There's a summary at the bottom: Bile, phlegm, and also wind, Imbalance and climate too, Carelessness and assault, With kamma result as the eighth. The Acintita Sutta states that you can't work out ...


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More worrying. Worry is habitual, thus you should train in concentration to be able to catch it and destroy this defilement. Think, 'Worry is useless. I must meditate to deal with worry. If my fear becomes true, then it is all the better to practice meditation right now so that I can deal with my fear if it is to happen.'


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Strictly speaking from personnal experience : Anxiety, sleepless nights, have greatly damaged my health during a decade. So worrying, stress, anxiety, are extremely harmful to the body (more than what is currently understood by allopathic medecine). I had to change life direction and resort to cultivating health and mental balance for a few years to restore ...


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Uncertainty occurs because of causes. There is no difference between uncertainty and cause & effect. Death is certain, life is uncertain: maranam niyatam, jivitam aniyatam It disintegrates, monk, that is why it’s called ‘the world’: lujjatīti kho, bhikkhu, tasmā lokoti vuccatī 'Many are the [possible] causes of my death. A snake might bite me, a ...


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