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Are you sure a black hole will destroy everything? Do you understand the world enough to determine what is best for other beings? Why did the Buddha declare the cosmos to be one of the four imponderables? How can you free something or somebody other than yourself as long as you're in shackles? I am sorry if this sounds harsh: Find the way of freedom from ...


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Monks and nuns generally take good care of their bodies so they may be better able to continue to share the dharma with those who may benefit. They keep good hygiene of their robes and living quarters to prevent disease and be healthy. Here is an excerpt that gives a specific example of personal hygiene: In the Anguttara Nikaya there is a short sutta in ...


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Last time I had the pleasure of speaking with the Buddha, he said that most of what he teaches he indeed had learned from Alara, but only after having completely realized and verified it in his own direct experience. Before he realized it in his own experience, he could only "pay the lip-service" to the teaching - he could say the right words from ...


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According to the wikipedia page on Samkhya: The earliest surviving authoritative text on classical Samkhya philosophy is the Samkhya Karika (c. 200 CE or 350–450 CE) of Īśvarakṛṣṇa. There were probably other texts in early centuries CE, however none of them are available today. Iśvarakṛṣṇa in his Kārikā describes a succession of the disciples from Kapila, ...


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The fully liberated ones (called arahants) do not experience any kind of mental suffering. They may experience physical pain which they endure and not suffer mentally from. They do not have latent tendencies (anusaya), defilements (kilesa), effluents (asava), fetters (samyojana), the five hindrances (pañca nīvaraṇāni), craving (tanha), clinging (upadana) and ...


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It’s almost funny (in a darkly humoristic way) that we who call ourselves “wise humans” (Homo Sapiens) can never see the one guaranteed way to put an end to our troubled and selfish behaviors—change our way of being. We always seem to take for granted that humans will always act in negative, selfish ways that harms everyone and everything around them. There ...


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In Iti 109 (quoted below), the Buddha indeed taught man to swim against his nature to become free from suffering. Renunciation (nekkhamma - subject to the middle way) is against the flow i.e. it's not natural to man. Craving is natural to man. This was said by the Blessed One, said by the Arahant, so I have heard: "Suppose a man was being carried along ...


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mindfulness meditation is primarily about detachment/ dissociation from life Mindfulness one should observe in a detached manner without attachment to the pleasant or aversion to the unpleasant, also having wisdom towards the neutral experiences which can be classified as mental states (citta), mental content (cetasika) or corporeal body (rupa), 5 ...


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Also why this is not exist in Thervada Buddhism when statue is in Bihar state of India? Probably because there's no concept of a female Buddha according to Early Buddhism (by Early Buddhism, I mean the earliest text strata translated into both the Theravada's Nikayas and Mahayana's Agamas). “He understands: ‘It is impossible, it cannot happen that a woman ...


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Sridhar, unfortunately there are Buddhists who seek a dissociative state. It's unfortunate that this happens often enough though, and some teachers do teach it. As a meditation teacher myself, I don't teach people to developed such a state; I warn them against it. Is the goal of mindfulness to develop ultimate dissociation? No. It's for freedom from ...


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Is the goal of mindfulness to develop ultimate dissociation? In this essay, Ven. Thanissaro begins to explain that the goal is to develop "appropriate attention": If, for example, you're a doctor in an emergency room [...] If you frame the symptoms in the wrong light, you can do more harm than good. If you frame them in the right light, you can ...


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Khanti/patience is indeed a very important virtue to cultivate. It's listed in Sn 2.4 as among one of the greatest protection for a practitioner. Also refer to many other related suttas. Patience, compliance, seeing contemplatives, discussing the Dhamma on timely occasions: This is the highest protection. ~~ Snp 2.4 ~~


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Why your question and all the other similar questions you linked are not getting a direct answer, but a shuffle is because the Buddha did not give an answer for such questions. You may read many shuffles here, but the truth is questions such as Begining of life, end of life (i.e. beginner and end of Samsara); or hypothetical scenario in which all sentient ...


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Nirvana is the goal of the Buddhist path. The literal meaning of the term is "blowing out" or "quenching". Nirvana is the ultimate spiritual goal in Buddhism. What Does It Feel Like to Be in Nirvana? Why, I'm glad you ask... just kidding. I wonder how likely it'd be for someone who already attained Nibbana to hang out at online Buddhist ...


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At it's core it works out as if a person went to mountains to meditate, his friend then brings him food & clothing. Eventually the amount of people interested in supporting this project grows. Then for some reason the supporters build something and invite the meditator to stay there. At some point there might be willingness and resources for others to ...


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I think the short answer might be "no" -- more-or-less as argued in this review of the book: Oh no! I found some errors in scholarship here. Tom Harpur's "Pagan Christ" is based on the idea that Christianity borrowed beliefs from paganism. Many scholars have argued in favor of this during the Victorian era and even into the early 1900's. ...


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This guide -- The Battersea Park Peace Pagoda -- says, In this statue the Vitarka Mudra, associated with explaining the Buddha’s teachings, with the right hand right raised and the tips of the forefinger and thumb touching, is combined with the Tarjani Mudra for warding off evil, with forefinger and little finger outstretched.


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Before his passing away, it is reported the Buddha is to have said: In whatsoever Dhamma and Discipline, Subhadda, there is not found the Noble Eightfold Path, neither is there found a true ascetic of the first, second, third, or fourth degree of saintliness. But in whatsoever Dhamma and Discipline there is found the Noble Eightfold Path, there is found a ...


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Nibbana - Destruction of taints is spoken of as Nibbana. It is also said 'cessation of existence is Nibbana'. Nibbana element with residue; An Arahant abides without delusion. In that is said to have attained Nibbana in this life. On the account of the absence of delusion there, it is called 'nibbana'. On account of that by which there is still the ...


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True Non-abiding Nirvana is experienced as tathata (suchness). Suchness is the state of attainment of the Third Noble Truth, when there's absolutely no craving for things to be other than they are. Because in suchness there's no conflict between "is" and "should", the dukkha (painful feeling of wrongness) does not arise. Everything is ...


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The ultimate cause of birth, death, disease and suffering is ignorance. Not rebirth. Not prevention of birth. The way to end suffering is to end craving by ending ignorance through cultivation of virtue, concentration and wisdom. For e.g. if you see a lot of foolish citizens who are not wearing face masks or social distancing in the time of the pandemic - ...


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This is subtle, and difficult. As I see it, the suggestion that the dharma has been 'forgotten by most' doesn't mean that the dharma has been 'literally' forgotten. It means that the proper sense of the dharma has been lost; that people still (in good faith) teach and learn what they call the dharma, but that the 'dharma' they teach and learn is the wrong ...


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The definition of "most" is indeed rather ambiguous. But if you think about it, the very notion of "Dharma have been forgotten" is also rather ambiguous, too: should we consider it forgotten when there's no-one left who can clearly explain phases of gradual arising of self-centred consciousness? Or is it when most Buddhists don't ...


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Something Eckhart Tolle once said... Patience is itself an expectation. When we are being patient, it effectively means that we are experiencing something we dislike, but have decided to wait calmly in the expectation the experience will eventually dissipate. Being patient in this sense is effortful, and like all efforts it will eventually run out of steam. ...


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From Dhammapada 184: The best moral practice is patience and forbearance; "Nibbana is Supreme", said the Buddhas. A bhikkhu does not harm others; one who harms others is not a bhikkhu. Alternative translation from here: Enduring patience is the highest austerity. "Nibbana is supreme," say the Buddhas. He is not a true monk who harms ...


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And what’s the impatient practice? It’s when someone abuses, annoys, or argues with you, and you abuse, annoy, or argue right back at them. This is called the impatient practice. And what’s the patient practice? It’s when someone abuses, annoys, or argues with you, and you don’t abuse, annoy, or argue back at them. This is called the patient practice. An4....


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Restraint I think that another way to frame patience is in terms of restraint. Why is this? If we see a mental defilement arise, we exercise restraint to not immediately give into it. We look at the situation and see it for what it is. In this way, we are exercising patience, but also restraint. Now what does the Buddha think of restraint? Well, Buddhist ...


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(Oddly, I am studying DN15 myself as of yesterday...) Buddhism is not life denying and negative. Buddhism is craving denying and negative. Craving leads to suffering. DN15:3.1: So: name and form are conditions for consciousness. Consciousness is a condition for name and form. Name and form are conditions for contact. Contact is a condition for feeling. ...


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In the Early Buddhist Texts, some texts have these statements attributed to the Buddha, and some do not. A recent discussion by scholars is occurred here https://discourse.suttacentral.net/t/democracy-or-immobilism-in-the-sangha-based-on-ebt/16544/49 Further materials can be found in that forum, and might also be referenced here https://discourse....


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