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Are you sure a black hole will destroy everything? Do you understand the world enough to determine what is best for other beings? Why did the Buddha declare the cosmos to be one of the four imponderables? How can you free something or somebody other than yourself as long as you're in shackles? I am sorry if this sounds harsh: Find the way of freedom from ...


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Monks and nuns generally take good care of their bodies so they may be better able to continue to share the dharma with those who may benefit. They keep good hygiene of their robes and living quarters to prevent disease and be healthy. Here is an excerpt that gives a specific example of personal hygiene: In the Anguttara Nikaya there is a short sutta in ...


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The Pali suttas say the Dhamma is taught only to those who are interested, per AN 9.5: The best sort of kindly speech is to teach the Dhamma again and again to someone who is engaged and who lends an ear. Etadaggaṃ, bhikkhave, peyyavajjānaṃ yadidaṃ atthikassa ohitasotassa punappunaṃ dhammaṃ deseti. https://suttacentral.net/an9.5/en/sujato ...


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From Vimalakirti Sutra: At that time, there lived in the great city of Vaisali a certain Licchavi, Vimalakirti by name. Having served the ancient Buddhas, he had generated the roots of virtue by honoring them and making offerings to them. He had attained tolerance as well as eloquence. He played with the great superknowledges. He had attained the power ...


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In MN 56, we see disciples of the founder of Jainism, Mahavira (called Nigantha Nataputta in the suttas) debate with the Buddha. Apparently, Nigantha Nataputta taught that physical deeds weigh more heavily than mental deeds. “Reverend Gotama, Nigaṇṭha Nātaputta doesn’t usually speak in terms of ‘deeds’. He usually speaks in terms of ‘rods’.” “Then ...


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According to the wikipedia page on Samkhya: The earliest surviving authoritative text on classical Samkhya philosophy is the Samkhya Karika (c. 200 CE or 350–450 CE) of Īśvarakṛṣṇa. There were probably other texts in early centuries CE, however none of them are available today. Iśvarakṛṣṇa in his Kārikā describes a succession of the disciples from Kapila, ...


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Last time I had the pleasure of speaking with the Buddha, he said that most of what he teaches he indeed had learned from Alara, but only after having completely realized and verified it in his own direct experience. Before he realized it in his own experience, he could only "pay the lip-service" to the teaching - he could say the right words from ...


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The fully liberated ones (called arahants) do not experience any kind of mental suffering. They may experience physical pain which they endure and not suffer mentally from. They do not have latent tendencies (anusaya), defilements (kilesa), effluents (asava), fetters (samyojana), the five hindrances (pañca nīvaraṇāni), craving (tanha), clinging (upadana) and ...


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In the third watch of the night He had the knowledge of the exhaustion of cankers, knowing that He had eradicated all defilements and made an end of ill. The Three Supreme Knowledges of Lord Buddha So the Buddha knew he had overcome defilements and was enlightened due to knowledge of the exhaustion of cankers. Also with the arising of knowledge of the ...


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This is a great question. In Buddha's time, there were many other ascetics claimed that they have attained Nibbana. However, the definition of Nibbana was varied. Buddha realised that the elimination of Dukkha is the Nibbana. Then he defined the Dukkha with his revolutionary definition including Sankhara Dukka. He realised the cause of Dukkha is the craving. ...


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The instruction to do "one thing at a time" is implied by the Buddha's praise of Sāriputta's practice, which was intense, deep and accomplished methodically one by one: MN111:1.6: The Buddha said this: “Sāriputta is astute, mendicants. He has great wisdom, widespread wisdom, laughing wisdom, swift wisdom, sharp wisdom, and penetrating wisdom. For a ...


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If you analyse the Sutta, you will find those who became Arahants by just listening to discourse are people who have already perfected Sila and Samadhi. For instance Buddhas first disciples, five ascetics.


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In Iti 109 (quoted below), the Buddha indeed taught man to swim against his nature to become free from suffering. Renunciation (nekkhamma - subject to the middle way) is against the flow i.e. it's not natural to man. Craving is natural to man. This was said by the Blessed One, said by the Arahant, so I have heard: "Suppose a man was being carried along ...


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mindfulness meditation is primarily about detachment/ dissociation from life Mindfulness one should observe in a detached manner without attachment to the pleasant or aversion to the unpleasant, also having wisdom towards the neutral experiences which can be classified as mental states (citta), mental content (cetasika) or corporeal body (rupa), 5 ...


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It’s almost funny (in a darkly humoristic way) that we who call ourselves “wise humans” (Homo Sapiens) can never see the one guaranteed way to put an end to our troubled and selfish behaviors—change our way of being. We always seem to take for granted that humans will always act in negative, selfish ways that harms everyone and everything around them. There ...


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If you want to know all about realized Bodhisattvas, their way of life and what their minds are like, you can do no better than Shantideva's Guide to the Bodhisattva's Way of Life. Picture the most sublimely altruistic mind(s) imaginable without one bit of self-cherishing and devoted only to that which is beneficial for other sentient beings in a completely ...


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There has been a debate among monks on the relationship to war that a Buddhist must have. War and Peace: A Buddhist Perspective By Bhikkhu Bodhi Thanissaro Bhikkhu's rebukes of Bhikkhu Bodhi's advocacy for a Buddhist doctrine of Just War I advise you to read it. The two monks explicitly discuss what a Buddhist should have done during WWII, and the Buddha'...


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There's a description of that here: Why Was the Sakyan Republic Destroyed? I think the article is based on the canon, but I've forgotten where in the canon I read of it. Anyway to quote from the article: When the Buddha learned about this outbreak of hostility, he came there himself. On seeing this revered and eminent person from their royal clan, the ...


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The Marks of a Great Man Lakkhaṇasutta =========== The Buddha said this: Bhagavā etadavoca: “There are thirty-two marks of a great man. A great man who possesses these has only two possible destinies, no other. “Dvattiṃsimāni, bhikkhave, mahāpurisassa mahāpurisalakkhaṇāni, yehi samannāgatassa mahāpurisassa dveva gatiyo bhavanti anaññā. https://...


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When I lived in Thailand: Monks were admitted to hospital. Monks took painkillers. Monks used medicine for internal parasites.


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From Dhammapada 184 "Nibbana is supreme," say the Buddhas. 43 Neither mother, father, nor any other relative can do one greater good than one's own well-directed mind.


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Let's say you are learning to play baseball. One of the first thing you find out is that the game has nine innings. What, you ask breathlessly, comes before the 1st inning???? While you are mulling that over, your turn comes at the plate. You stand there asking yourself "What comes before the 1st? What comes before the 1st????". As you delve deeply ...


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I do not have a sutta citation for it (I spent several hours looking), but there is one sutta where the Buddha was pressed for a first cause and he said that if such a thing must be had it would be taṇhā, thirst. Not avijja, blindness. To say that blindness was the first cause would be to mistake the individual as being the creator (something not uncommon ...


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There are several traditional takes on this. According to some commentary the Dhamma declines gradually so that there is a steady decline and progressive lack of higher attainments in the world until there are no attainments left. Based on this kind of reasoning some hold that there is a cap on what will be attained in our time, some hold that ...


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You've asked for a Mahayana text, which may or may not include MN121, in which the Buddha says: MN121 Whatever ascetics and brahmins enter and remain in the pure, ultimate, supreme emptiness—whether in the past, future, or present—all of them enter and remain in this same pure, ultimate, supreme emptiness. Although "emptiness" is probably what ...


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From AccessToInsight's Glossary of Pali and Buddhist Terms: samaṇera (samaṇerī): Literally, a small samaṇa; a novice monk (nun) who observes ten precepts and who is a candidate for admission to the order of bhikkhus (bhikkhunīs). bhikkhu: A Buddhist monk; a man who has given up the householder's life to live a life of heightened virtue (see ...


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You have misunderstood the sutta SN 54.9. The Buddha taught the technique of loathsomeness of the body, which is to be used to remove feelings of sexual lust and attachment to the physical form. This technique is useful to be practised by a monk or practitioner who is overwhelmed by sexual lust. However, too much of this practice, especially when it is ...


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Also why this is not exist in Thervada Buddhism when statue is in Bihar state of India? Probably because there's no concept of a female Buddha according to Early Buddhism (by Early Buddhism, I mean the earliest text strata translated into both the Theravada's Nikayas and Mahayana's Agamas). “He understands: ‘It is impossible, it cannot happen that a woman ...


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Is the goal of mindfulness to develop ultimate dissociation? In this essay, Ven. Thanissaro begins to explain that the goal is to develop "appropriate attention": If, for example, you're a doctor in an emergency room [...] If you frame the symptoms in the wrong light, you can do more harm than good. If you frame them in the right light, you can ...


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Sridhar, unfortunately there are Buddhists who seek a dissociative state. It's unfortunate that this happens often enough though, and some teachers do teach it. As a meditation teacher myself, I don't teach people to developed such a state; I warn them against it. Is the goal of mindfulness to develop ultimate dissociation? No. It's for freedom from ...


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