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Thanissaro Bhikkhu said the other Brahma viharas are applications of Metta, and that is why Metta is the core focus in the practice. Of these four emotions, goodwill (metta) is the most fundamental. It's the wish for true happiness, a wish you can direct to yourself or to others. Goodwill was the underlying motivation that led the Buddha to search ...


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The practice of the Brahmaviharas is comprehensively dealt in Chapter IX of the Visuddhimagga. Online resource :- Visuddhimagga. Daniel Ingram says that the Brahmaviharas are: Loving-Kindness (Metta): the natural well-wishing for one's self and all beings. Compassion (Karuna): the natural wishing that the suffering of one's self and all beings will ...


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Brahmavihara manifest naturally from non-defilement. Regardless, Brahmavihara is taught as a preliminary practise to Anapanasati. For example, from MN 62 and MN 118: Develop the meditation of good will. For when you are developing the meditation of good will, ill-will will be abandoned. Develop the meditation of compassion. For when you are ...


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The metta sutta was probably addressed to monks because the stanza opens with already being established in the noble eightfold path, as follows: This is what should be done By one who is skilled in goodness, And who knows the path of peace: Let them be able and upright, Straightforward and gentle in speech, Humble and not conceited, ...


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Brahmaviharas is a lower type of meditation than Anapanasati. In Brahmaviharas you use your intellect, to make up suggestions or narratives, that condition your point of view a certain way. In Anapanasati you don't use your intellect to generate anything, you just let go of hangups and let them dissolve. Anapanasati is more direct. The Buddha said, we don't ...


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Q2. Also, can I know the simple explanation of what these actually mean I will breathe in calming bodily fabrication. This is a mistranslation. It should be 'body fabricator'. The body fabricator is defined in MN 44 as the in & out breathing. The breathing is the body fabricator because when the breathing is calm, the body is calm; if the ...


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It seems to be possible. Following elaborates on this. The “divine abodes” (brahma,vihāra) are so called because these are the qualities of the higher divine beings or brahmas. They are called “immeasurables” (appamāṇā, appamaññā) is another term for the divine abodes because the practice is only complete when we break down the barrier or duality of ...


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The scriptures generally mention the practise of all four brahma vihara together. As for your 2nd question, I suppose the brahma vihara are dependent upon metta. If there is no friendliness & goodwill towards others, the other brahma vihara cannot be cultivated.


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There are clear definitions given in Chapter IX -- The Divine Abidings of the Visuddhimagga: Now, as to the meaning firstly of loving-kindness, compassion, gladness and equanimity: it fattens (mejjati), thus it is loving-kindness (mettá); it is solvent (siniyhati) is the meaning. Also: it comes about with respect to a friend (mitta), [318] or it ...


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How is metta (having desire for someone's well-being) compatible with equanimity? These Dhamma Lists warn that "indifference" is the "near enemy" of "equanimity"; but could you maybe explain briefly what the right view is, how to distinguish indifference from equanimity, or to make equanimity compatible with metta? i entertain ...


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There are probably as many answers to this question as there are Buddhists, but as you ask the question to all, I thought maybe I can offer something about the rule, rather than the form. There are several textual sources regarding what is appropriate for dedication - in general one may dedicate ones' actions any way one may wish, but then the behaviour ...


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The dictionary descriptions of compassion and pity are similar. But in modern English usage, pity has an element of holding yourself superior to whatever conditions are affecting the person you feel pity towards. So you may feel sorrow for someone and pity them, but at the same time feel they are in some way responsible for their predicament. It's a subtle ...


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Q1. Is doing Dhatu manasikara first and doing Anapanasati afterward a smoother and an effective way of doing Anapanasati? Certainly. MN 62 is a very powerful sutta for establishing an ideal attitude towards meditation. I used to use MN 62 for guided meditation when I was working on meditation retreats, years ago. Firstly, the meditation on the five ...


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In the essay "The Four Sublime States" by Ven. Nyanaponika Thera, there is a chapter entitled "The Inter-relations of the Four Sublime States". I quote a part of it below: The translation used here: Love = metta, compassion = karuna, equanimity = upekkha, sympathetic joy = mudita. I would have preferred to translate mudita as "empathetic joy" rather than "...


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Uppekkha is what is used to straighten Karuna. Not Muditha. Compassion can easily turn into sadness. When that happens you view the situation in terms of Karma and Vipaka: “All beings are the owners of their karma; their happiness and unhappiness depends upon their actions, not on my wishes for them.” Metta(kindness) can turn into lust when practiced ...


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Upekkha is freedom from all points of self-reference; it is indifference only to the demands of the ego-self with its craving for pleasure and position, not to the well-being of one's fellow human beings. True equanimity is the pinnacle of the four social attitudes that the Buddhist texts call the "divine abodes": boundless loving-kindness, ...


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I would agree with others who say that it is often taken for granted in the Suttas that one is already dear to oneself. The lesson the Buddha adds is that we should extend this regard to others. When one regards others' lives as significant as one's own, this extension becomes natural. Searching all directions with your awareness, you find no one dearer ...


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Here's one about householders and the four pleasant mental abidings. But I think this refers to the four rupa jhanas rather than the four brahmaviharas. From Gihi Sutta (AN 5.179): Then Anathapindika the householder, surrounded by about 500 lay followers, went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. So the ...


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"Jhana" itself is a "Brahma realm" therefore the mind should have buoyancy & metta if it has developed genuine "piti & sukha". This "metta" is from & the same as the natural development of love & non-judging required for self-development of Anapanasati. In other words, there is no need to give up Anapanasati to develop metta. The self-...


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By all means remain with Anapannasati. First of all, it is foundational. Listening to your story, it sounds as though your practice is trying to correct itself. The Anapannasati will make you more sociable as an end result, but at your current practice you are still retreating into yourself. It's the cultivation of equanimity that will be crucial, as always....


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I do not believe the Vinaya rules prohibiting such ordinations are punitive in nature. They are in place to protect the Sangha jewel. Often monks and nuns need to care for each other in old age as householders will not. As such, many communities will not ordain older or enfeebled people simply because it will place too much of a burden on the healthy monks ...


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I've practiced metta by wishing for all beings to be well & happy, happy in the highest sense of the word in particular and thus utterly victorious. I don't do it blandly, i tend to do it in verse and most enthusiasticly. Basically i hold that the Metta Sutta isn't just a poem but is actually a guided meditation and i train analogically; This is what ...


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The Abhidhamma is useful for this question. I quote from The Abhidhamma in Practice by N.K.G. Mendis. Starting from the top: The Abhidhamma deals with realities existing in an ultimate sense, called in Pali paramattha dhammaa. There are four such realities: Citta, mind or consciousness, defined as that which knows or experiences an object. Citta occurs as ...


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The first thing that must be said is that metta, the Brahma-vihara, samadhi, and mindfulness meditation (vipassana) are closely related and are major practices of Theravadin Buddhism. Metta, of course, in one of the four practices of the Brahma-viharas. And the practice of mindfulness meditation has the purpose of bring psychological insight into karma (...


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Ideally what you should be doing is a different kind of Ānāpānassati Meditation. What almost everyone will try to do is the "breath mediation” or “mindfulness of breathing”. Very few of us know that Ānāpānasati is infinitely more deeper than just focusing on one’s breath. In many suttās it is described as assāsa/passāsa, which conventionally means taking ...


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After the 1st triad in Anapanasati Sutta: First Tetrad: Contemplation of the Body (kāya) Discerning the in and out breathing Discerning long or short breaths Experiencing the whole body (sabbakāaya) Calming bodily formations In the Maha Satipatthana Sutta other forms a Body Contemplations are mentioned. "There are in this body (1) the earth-...


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There is relation between Anapanasati and four Satipathanas. ānāpānasati & the first satipaṭṭhāna "[1] Now, on whatever occasion a monk breathing in long discerns that he is breathing in long; or breathing out long, discerns that he is breathing out long; or breathing in short, discerns that he is breathing in short; or breathing out short, discerns ...


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For sharing merits with the departed relatives we use, Pali verse: ldam me ñatinam hotu sukhita hontu natayo [3 times] Meaning: Let this merit be received by my relatives, and may they be happy [3 times] For sharing merits with the devas and nagas we use, Pali verse: Akasattha ca bhummattha Deva naga mahiddhika puññam tam anumoditva ...


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