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In my view, you become "Buddhist" when you willingly make a promise--any promise--to the Buddha that you would feel guilty or uncomfortable breaking. It could be that you, maybe, look at a Buddha statue and promise to meditate at sunrise every day for a month (for example). It doesn't matter if you believe the Buddha-nature is "real" or ...


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If you assume no 'I' or '' mine', no rebirth. If you assume 'I' or 'mine', rebirth makes sense. The universe is empty, energy can only change forms. So for 'now', everywhere sums up to 0. Flip 90 degrees, so for 'here' (I), everywhen sums up to 0. This is kamma-vipaka. All action has entirely linear consequences overall. Good = good, bad = bad. This way, ...


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I don't know if you're familiar with psychology, but there's a theory there called the "Cycle of Violence", which holds that violent acts repeat themselves. They don't just repeat themselves within relationships — as each person in turn takes revenge or retribution for the other's violent behavior — but repeat across society as people turn their ...


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You are looking at karma and rebirth as having two different perspectives - figurative/ metaphorical or literal. There's another two ways to look at this - "there is a self" and "all phenomena is not self". If there is a self, you would think that the person who committed some action, would experience its results. If there is a self, this ...


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I think of karma, seeds of karma, and fruits of karma as individual's action, latent effects of such action, and individual experience resulting from past action, correspondingly. Nothing more, nothing less. I don't read any unscientific mumbo-jumbo into these concepts, purely cause-and-effect. I think of rebirth as a type of karmic process that spans ...


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'Kamma' means 'intentional action' therefore is never 'figurative'. As for the word 'rebirth' meaning 'reincarnation', there appears no equivalent Pali word in the original scriptures. Therefore what is actually 'figurative' is the idea of a 'rebirth after the ending of life'. In original Buddhism, the literal meaning of 'death' ('marana') & 'following ...


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