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Kriya citta is functional consciousness, meaning it performs a function without being karmically potent. In an arahant, it replaces kusala citta. An arahant does not create karma so their seemingly wholesome mind states are called kriya (functional). Specifically, there are eight types of sahetuka-kāmāvacara-kriyā-citta - functional consciousness in the ...


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The outcome of deeds is discussed in AN4.233: “Mendicants, I declare these four kinds of deeds, having realized them with my own insight. What four? There are dark deeds with dark results; bright deeds with bright results; dark and bright deeds with dark and bright results; and neither dark nor bright deeds with neither dark nor ...


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Buddha spoke about cessation of karma and liberation from karma. For Arahant, or for Buddha, there's no acquiring of karma anymore. Indeed, if they still acquired karma, how could we call it "liberation"? But how can an Arahant or a Buddha act without acquiring karma? In my understanding, this is possible because only appropriated action, i.e. action ...


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Like they say on reddit, the 3 doors are not in the suttas. The 3 doors are some inventions from the commentators of some mix of commentaries, abidhammas, and suttas. Those are not the dhamma. Even the mix of commentaries, abidhammas, and suttas on which they comment is not the dhamma. Even the suttas alone can be blindly said to be the dhamma. So first, ...


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Without psychic powers, it's actually quite difficult to determine who is an arahant. Fortunately, the Buddha gave some guidelines in MN47 about how to assess a potential teacher: MN47:4.1: “Mendicants, a mendicant who is an inquirer, unable to comprehend another’s mind, should scrutinize the Realized One for two things—things that can be seen and heard: ...


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The Buddha's Dhamma is: Svakkhato: well taught and complete Akaliko: transcends time Since this was not taught targeting a particular audience in a particular era and also since it is complete it is relevant today as well.


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To add to OyaMist's good answer. In the sutta below, we see that even one arahant (with no psychic powers) is unable to recognize another arahant. Ven. Sariputta, the arahant and excellent teacher, could not recognize that Ven. Bhaddiya is an arahant, and tried to teach him. The Buddha saw this and was amused, because the Buddha himself is able to recognize ...


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The Buddha and his immediate followers whom he declares has seen the unborn are sure Arahant, but how is one to assert a few century-old teachers as Arahant? I think that is why the written / oral transmission directly from the Buddha time is very important. That doesn't mean that the living teacher is to be distrusted, teachers like Ajahn Chah are a living ...


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I've read some of his stuff on the asubhasannam training & progression. It's pretty good/interesting. Title is "Samadhi begets wisdom" or something like this. I've also read excerpts from his other book, that about Ajahn Mun. That one makes me think that the author, if he himself believes those things, at the time of writing, is quite certainly not ...


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Minimum common grounds for all sotapanna and all arahant. The "minimum common grounds" both literally and symbolically is the fulfillment of virtues: “These nine persons, Sāriputta, passing away with a residue remaining, are freed from hell, the animal realm, and the sphere of afflicted spirits; freed from the plane of misery, the bad destination,...


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There is the idea of the ten fetters (samyojana), and how each of the four stages towards enlightenment is a progressive liberation from these fetters (or uprooting as you put it). They provide a framework of how we can label the stages of progress: "Bhikkhus, there are these ten fetters. What ten? The five lower fetters and the five higher fetters. And ...


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For stream-enterer we have: AN6.34:4.4: But those who have experiential confidence in the Buddha, the teaching, and the Saṅgha, and have the ethics loved by the noble ones, do know that they are stream-enterers.” For arahant we have release from ten fetters: AN10.13:1.1: “Mendicants, there are ten fetters. What ten? The five lower fetters and the five ...


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I think you may be over-analyzing. Remember, the ten fetters (and the three doors, and the eight precepts, and the three jewels, and the four noble truths: Buddhists really love lists...) are pointers to a single common attitude. It isn't that we try to achieve emptiness and singleness and wishlessness; it's not a conjunction of different efforts. We try to ...


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Buddha's mind is unshakable. But they still get tired and has to rest. "Ananda, speak to the Kapilavatthu Sakyans about the person who follows the practice for one in training. [2] My backaches. I will rest it." https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.053.than.html


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In the sutta, the Buddha stated that when encountering a painful physical feeling, due to aversion, an uninstructed worldling will generate a painful mental feeling. Now he has two painful feelings, instead of one. On the other hand, the Arahant, when he feels painful or pleasant physical feelings, he doesn't have aversion or lust/greed, so he doesn't ...


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From MN121, where the Buddha discusses his current practice with Ananda, we have: They understand: ‘This field of perception is empty of the perception of the defilements of sensuality, desire to be reborn, and ignorance. There is only this that is not emptiness, namely that associated with the six sense fields dependent on this body and conditioned ...


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Citta is a famous lay householder who has even taught monks, for example, in SN 41.1, SN 41.5 and SN 41.7. The monks he taught, stated: “You’re fortunate, householder, so very fortunate, to traverse the Buddha’s deep teachings with the eye of wisdom.” In SN 41.8, he states that he has achieved mastery of the fourth rupa jhana. SN 41, called ...


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