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7

There might be something along those lines in SN 4.23 Godhika Sutta. Page 85 of The Patimokkha Rules Translated & Explained says, Case (b) is apparently derived from SN 4.23, where Ven. Godhika takes his life and gains arahantship just moments before death


6

The orthodox Theravada interpretation is that he went through all four stages. [I]n the course of his long wanderings in samsāra, the bodhisatta had been to all the realms except the five suddhāvāsa realms which are meant only for those who have attained anāgāmi stage. The bodhisatta usually attains all the four stages on the path only in his last ...


6

Your question seems very sensible. Some thoughts... I think you're wrong to suggest that the Buddha was 'not sure what will happen...'. There are some things that may be known but not explained. He advises us not to worry about metaphysical problems and just take the medicine, but this does not mean these problems are not understood or the facts not known. ...


5

He said that sati is like a raft in the sense that it should be given up as soon as the goal, arahantship, has been reached. Sati is "non-forgetting" of the Dhamma Truth. To give more strength to his claim he also pointed out that sati is not one of the 10 parami (perfections). This does not make sense because effort, determination, patience, etc are ...


4

Definitly, As per science when there is a start, there must be end. Even our galaxy will expire. you can take example of anything in this world, nothing is permanent.


4

The passage doesn't imply that at all. It's just that homosexual misbehavior or other abnormal ways of breaking the 3rd precept are not discussed here. Gravity of the offence also depends on the purity of the being who's subjected to it. Not on how he/she deals with it. It's similar to how merits of giving dependent on the virtuousness of the recipient. ...


4

I think the Buddha said he was an Arahant. The Ariyapariyesana Sutta says, "Then, wandering by stages, I arrived at Varanasi, at the Deer Park in Isipatana, to where the group of five monks were staying. From afar they saw me coming and, on seeing me, made a pact with one another, (saying,) 'Friends, here comes Gotama the contemplative: living luxuriously,...


4

According to the Patimokkha rules: Should any bhikkhu, without direct knowledge, claim a superior human state, a truly noble knowledge and vision, as present in himself, saying, "Thus do I know; thus do I see," such that regardless of whether or not he is cross-examined on a later occasion, he — being remorseful and desirous of purification — ...


4

Maybe your friend meant to say that an arahant no longer has to consciously make an effort to develop sati? An arahant has developed all 8 limbs of the Noble Eightfold Path to perfection such that they've become second nature. To him, sati's no longer an effort to be developed. It's become his way of life. It's like a novice martial arts student at first has ...


4

Most of your question revolves around your (expected) lack of knowledge about how Buddhism defines suffering, how it defines happiness, and how it explains one or the other occurs. That's why, when you talk about suffering, happiness, and what happens to arahant after death, you should understand the context within which these are seen in Buddhism. Few ...


4

As you found out on Reddit, the story sounds a lot like that of Yasa, who didn't of course become an Arahant before meeting the Buddha, and certainly not in his sleep! But to your general question, stories of lay people who have become arahants and then left home do exist in the texts. A notable example that comes to mind is Khema Theri (see palikanon.com/...


4

Linguistically, 'sakkāya' ('sat-kaya') means 'true' or 'real body' rather than 'own body'. If it meant 'own body' ('sa-kaya'), this would make our study of theory much easier. The word 'kaya' means 'group' or 'collection' rather than merely 'physical body'. In defining 'sakkaya', MN 44 says: Visākha, the Buddha said that these five grasping ...


4

In my understanding, there is no controversy here at all. The explanation can be very simple: Before stream-entry, someone can think: "I am this body" or "I am inside this body" or "I am the perceiver of all my experience" or "I am the decision maker of all my actions" or "I am my memories" or "I am the thinker of thoughts". With stream-entry these ...


3

First of all, Arahanths never feel sadness, grief, hate etc. They don't have wives, but they may have ex-wives. if the Arahath has psychic powers he might fly away to spare the people from acquiring extremely bad karma or he might stay if he saw it as an unavoidable consequence of a past Karma. Either way, he will never get upset no matter what happens. ...


3

If and when a lay-follower attains arahant-ship, he or she has to either enter the Order that very day or else must attain parinibbàna. This is a Dhammata. This is conformity to the Dhammaniyāma – a general rule in Dhamma. This is discussed in the Milindapanha, which is a set of three Buddhist books that records the dialogues between the Indian monk ...


3

In the Pali Canon Study "Nibbana as Living Experience / The Buddha and The Arahant" by Lily de Silva a well described section on the Four Analytical Knowledges can be found. Here is a quote from the study: Among arahants too there are differences in attainment. In one place the Buddha states that in a group of 500 monks sixty are arahants with the six ...


3

Ven. Ananda’s realization of emancipation happened when he was neither walking, standing, sitting or lying down. Ven. Ananda was doing the walking meditation at that time. It is interesting to note that meditation could be practiced employing any of the four bodily postures, and he never got out of his 'walking meditation.. For emancipation one has to ...


3

Not if, my dear friend, when. Suffering will always exist. It is after all the first noble truth. But I think your question is a theoretical one, and a very good one. Yes, theoreticaly, if all beings now on earth attained enlightenment, then there would be no sentient beings as we know them (born live die). But back to the vastness of reality's ...


3

"Compassion is characterized as promoting the aspect of allaying suffering. Its function resides in not [enduring] others' suffering. It is manifested as non-cruelty. Its proximate cause is to see helplessness in those overwhelmed by suffering. It succeeds when it makes cruelty subside, and it fails when it produces sorrow." -Visuddhimagga Compassion is a ...


3

All of the answers are great and I will add few things. If you compare the bliss and happiness of the beings who lives in the spirit world(astral realms, heavenly realms, higher heavens etc.) or the perfect happiness of parinibbana- the earth is really a hell for the beings who are not able to go beyond the limitations of their forms internally. A human's ...


3

Page 18 of The Paccekabuddha: A Buddhist Ascetic A Study of the Concept of the Paccekabuddha in Pali Canonical and Commentarial Literature II. I. The Period In Which No Buddha Exists Paccekabuddhas are said to exist only in periods when there are no Buddhas. “A person realises Paccekabodhi only when reborn at a time when there is no Buddha” (S-a ...


3

Dreams are not mentioned a lot int he suttas. Perhaps you can search the vinaya instead of the suttas. THe best there is for the suttas is ''the lack of evil dreams'', from metta "Monks, eleven advantages are to be expected from the release (deliverance) of heart by familiarizing oneself with thoughts of loving-kindness[1], by the cultivation of ...


3

In its essence, "kamma" means "action" with attachment. While the suttas do refer to "kamma without attachment" namely, "neither-dark-nor-bright kamma" (AN 4.237), this type of kamma is also called the "kamma that ends kamma" (AN 6.63). Therefore, it is not really "kamma". the essential meaning of "kamma" is "action with attachment", as follows: And ...


2

I am sorry i do not remember the names in this.But here is the complete story. There was an ambitious monk while Buddha was alive.He wanted to reach nirvana but he had a little problem.He was able to reach "Samadhi" but couldn't hold on to it.he kept loosing and regaining it.He was terrified by the idea of facing his death without a "Samadhi" at least.He ...


2

The problem with "lay dhamma teachers" is that people don't take you seriously as a spiritual guide, if you are still a householder who's unable to give up sexual activities, gold etc. There might have been lay people who taught the Dhamma to small groups, but when there are many enlightened monks around, you don't get much recognition. In any case, a lay ...


2

A lay person who becomes an Arahant must become a monk or they will die? This is not by the Buddha but by Bhikkhu Nagasena in the Milindapanha (refer to Wikipedia). Bhikkhu Nagasena was the monk who gave the illogical & false analogy of the candle flame to explain reincarnation. Can anyone explain what this teaching means? I suppose it means when ...


2

To find or identify noble people can be difficult, even impossible, because you yourself must have some idea about the True Dhamma to be able to do this. Therefore, a problem arises similar to the question of: "What occurs 1st, the chicken or the egg?" The Canki Sutta provides the following preliminary answer to the question: How is truth discovered? ...


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