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Here are some guidelines, which might help with asking questions ("please help me analyse X?") on this site: Optionally use a label like mahayana -- see the "Minimizing controversy" topics in this summary of site policies -- doing that will help to avoid the "that's a wrong question" kind of answer. That kind of non-answer is already not ideal -- see e.g. ...


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Yes puthujjanas crave intellectualism, building fantasies, speculating, building a system of thoughts, classifying ideas, creating ideas, searching for definitions, and they always invent a story where they are good people for spending their day doing philosophy. Always claiming that their speculation ''makes things clearer''. It is completely normal. And, ...


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From my perspective of watching Buddhist teacher(s) at work, I think they get weary of student having too many ideas, pushing these thoughts forward, wanting to discuss them etc. From teacher's perspective it is like: "dear student, would you stop talking about your ideas for a moment and listen to the framework I'm trying to give you?" Therefore this ...


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Excellent question. You're definitely onto something. As everyone here said, wrong thoughts are real, these are thoughts that have a nature of conflict: thoughts of wanting more, thoughts of not wanting anymore, thoughts like "it's not supposed to be like this". Our tactical goal is Peace, a state of mind when there's no inner conflict, no ...


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These are not mutually exclusive. In fact, the latter method contains the 1st method you mentioned as the last resort. So do both in tandem as needed: OP: One would be to try to ignore the thoughts, not give them energy, not identify with them, be present and in time they would go into the background. Basically they are just thoughts, they are not you. You ...


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As I said in other answers, in Mahayana there's plenty of analysis. No need to convince them. Perhaps the only correction necessary is to your own attitude, to realize there were lots of smart people before you, and to try and learn from them.


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In the Hindu tradition they talk about four different yogas, or spiritual learning styles (the following adapted from the Vedanta Society, of whom I am fond): Bhakti Yoga: the path of love and devotion. This path emphasizes practices such as prayer, chanting, and meditation on the loving presence in our lives. Jnana Yoga: the path of knowledge. This path ...


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There's no contradiction. Questions such as this one arises when trying to understand Buddhism and meditation from an intellectual point of view, which is not really possible due to the depth and profundity of the Dhamma. Go practice meditation and questions such as these naturally get answered and settled. This question belongs to the 5th mental Hindrance ...


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Buddhism teaches there is wrong thought, as follows: And what is wrong resolve? Being resolved on sensuality, on ill will, on harmfulness. This is wrong resolve....One makes an effort for the abandoning of wrong resolve & for entering right resolve: This is one's right effort. One is mindful to abandon wrong resolve & to enter & remain in right ...


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I can't seem to reconsile these two thoughts. Expressing thoughts as "your thoughts" may be a source of vexation. There is a possessiveness here that can be relinquished--they're just thoughts. Relinquishing the possessiveness here, meditation becomes tranquil: SN35.246:4.25: As they search in this way, their thoughts of ‘I’ or ‘mine’ or ‘I am’ ...


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The answer to your question is that it is not what thoughts you think, but how you think them. The thoughts that arise come from your mental basis. From it you think a certain way. Your basis determines if you like or dislike the thoughts which arise. Practicing Sila and Metta will change, transform, your basis and better thoughts will then arise. If hatred ...


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Case 19 of the Mumonkan Nansen's "Ordinary Mind Is the Way" Jõshû asked Nansen, "What is the Way?" "Ordinary mind is the Way," Nansen replied. "Shall I try to seek after it?" Jõshû asked. "If you try for it, you will become separated from it," responded Nansen. "How can I know the Way unless I try for it?...


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Two key questions for this are: what is the main deep underlying purpose behind your question? What do you expect to achieve after whatever "method" you start following? If what you want is "simply" relax your head for awhile, I think any approach that takes such negative thoughts away in that very moment may be useful. But I suspect that won't solve the ...


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Avoiding conceptual thought and eschewing analysis isn’t necessarily exclusive of self reflection. In fact, conceptual thought is often responsible for keeping us at one remove from our neuroses, hang ups, and obstacles (one common one, at least in Zen, is the devaluing of the intellect!) The less we rely on the conceptual mind, the clearer we can see ...


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Since you're a fan of daoism, keep that aphorism from the daode in mind: "The master has one attitude for all things." That attitude is as slippery as wet ice, and impossible to express in words, but... You can think of Buddhist practice as pointing you in its direction. The problem with intellect in general is that intellect is intrinsically aggressive and ...


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