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Anicca is not an+icca, rather it is a+nicca. The Sanskrit equivalent is anitya, which is a+nitya. Nicca according to wisdomlib means: nicca : (adj.) constant; continuous; permanent. (Source): BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary Anicca according to wisdomlib means: anicca : (adj.) not stable; impermanent. (Source): BuddhaSasana: Concise ...


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A literal reading of this translation brings the conclusion there is the same person transmigrating or reincarnating from life to life. Therefore, there will obviously be the impression of a permanent substance, such as a "soul", reincarnating from life to life. The Neo-Buddhists can argue until they are blue in the face that what transmigrates is a "re-...


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from an EBT (early buddhist text) perspective: http://lucid24.org/tped/d/dhamma/index.html#dhammamsutva ☸Dhamma, dhamma ☸Dhamma = The Buddha's Teaching. Dhamma = Natural laws of the universe, like impermanence, death, illness, etc. dhamma = idea/thought cognizable by the mind (6aya): 💭 manasā dhammaṃ viññāya. dhamma = thing. A broad term that can mean ...


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What you describe about attachment to mental image creating dukkha is correct. But this is not what's called Anicca. This is closer to what we in Mahayana call Sunyata, emptiness (of all phenomena or mental images). Anicca refers to constant change, like the clouds drifting continuously. Because everything is drifting, you can't build happiness on top of it....


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The sutta quoted says Nibbana is an "ayatana" or "base". Therefore, it is a sense object. The "knower" of Nibbana is mind-consciousness rather than a "self". This "knower" is a "nama-dhamma", "mental element" or "conditioned element". Nibbana itself is the "unconditioned element" ("asankhata dhatu" - MN 115) therefore the Nibbana Element is "unsupported" ...


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The difference is significant. To say: "This is not the self", is to point to some existing thing and having examined it with the criteria for what is worthy to consider the self (that is, that it is something that is under one's control) and finding it out of one's control, the statement is simply the expression of an observable, provable fact. To say: "...


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The question is loaded with erroneous doctrines that epitomise this other question. There is no such thing as "dry vipassana". Since the suttas (SN 22.59) say vipassana results in dispassion & nirodha, obviously any vipassana-dispassion-nirodha will contribute to calmness & samadhi. Vipassana means 'clear seeing'. Since 'vipassana' is 'seeing', it ...


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I think that "atta" and "atman" are the same words, two different languages (Pali and Sanskrit). That in a Buddhist context, "atta" (and its converse, "anatta") are related to ideas like upādānakkhandha (from SN 56.11) and sakkāyadiṭṭhi ... and furthermore that (according to doctrine) any/all theories about self (or "self-existence"?) are unsatisfactory or ...


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This topic is analyzed a hundred times over in all schools. For example, in The Questions of King Milinda: The king said: ‘He who is born, Nāgasena, does he remain the same or become another?’ [Nagasena:] ‘Neither the same nor another.’ [King:] ‘Give me an illustration.’ [N] ‘Now what do you think, O king? You were once a baby, a tender ...


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When the Pali suttas say that it is not the "same" bundle of psycho-physical properties that is born and dies The words "birth" ("jati") and "death" ("marana') are defined in SN 12.2 as producing or imputing the idea of "a being" ("satta") upon the manifestations or changing appearances of the aggregates. What is important to understand is not so much the ...


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The arising and cease of the aggregates (form, feelings, perception, mental formations and consciousness) occurs everytime contact happens. When contact occurs, new feelings, perceptions and consciousness arise, which are affected by the previous mind-states. As a result, mental formations are altered as well. And form is not the exception: with contact, ...


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I can't easily tell a difference between "no self" and "not self" in English -- and if there is a difference (if you can construct a distinction in meaning) I think it's too fine a difference to be significant -- like if someone tells you something is "a mile away" and you get out your micrometer. I mean, the "a" prefix in Pali is a negator, which appears ...


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This question crops up regularly, and I suspect it's the cause of a lot of worry for those just getting to know the teachings. It was for me at one time. The confusion is caused by the ultimate non-duality of knower and known, experience and experiencer. Once these distinctions are transcended then we cannot talk about experiencing and knowing in the ...


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Yes the buddha says that conditioned things are empty, which means they are empty of self like he says so in https://suttacentral.net/sn35.85/en/bodhi or even https://suttacentral.net/sa273/en/choong In fact he even says that knowing that things are empty, not self, dukkha and all that is the trigger for liberation ‘The first absorption is a basis for ...


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To add to ChrisW's answer, which I like. To me, it sounds like "not-self" means - this body, this mind, these emotions, these memories, these impulses, this experience, this life - is not "I", nor is it "mine". - and this is exactly what the Buddha says in many places in the Canon. while "No self" means - "self does not exist". To this the Buddha said: ...


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Sounds like the hinderances have been temporarily tamed to some degree. 💚Oneness as I experience it using metta, self investigation and mindfulness just means there doesn't nessasarily have to be a distinction made by us human beings between me and other, us and them, tree and it's background, hand and fingers, sky and ground, good and bad, out and in,...


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Samdhavata-Samsarata (translated above as "wander and transmigrate") literally means "continuously run or flow". It evokes an image of water in a river, carrying itself forward but never running out. This is a reference to the stream of life in nature. In context of this sutta I would translate it as "reproduction". Generations of sentient beings derive ...


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The word dhamma in these passages has multiple meanings and can only be understood in the context of the passage they come from as you seem to understand. This is difficult for most Buddhist students and anyone who does not speak the original language of these ancient texts. That is why it is important to rely upon good translations and on good spiritual ...


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There are two languages, Pali and Sanskrit. Pali sounds like a mumbled version of Sanskrit, basically. Many of the consonants found in Sanskrit words are skipped in corresponding Pali words. So Dharma is Sanskrit and Dhamma is Pali. Atma is Sanskrit and Atta is Pali. Anatma is Sanskrit and Anatta is Pali. Sarva is Sanskrit and Sabba is Pali. Nirvana is ...


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Buddha is pretty cool. Jesus is too. Shiva is pretty cool. There are cool guys everywhere. The real question is what kind of teacher are you willing to understand? Shiva is like falling down a bottomless pit. Which is safe as long as it's bottomless. Jesus knew others like he knew himself and that creates a wonderful basis of good. Buddha didn't like things ...


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OP: In daily life, I guess my self-grasping is not very salient; people tell me I'm considerate, open. Just because you're considerate and open, doesn't mean you're not self-grasping. Even if you think "I am considerate and open" and feel happy about that, that's already self-grasping because you're associating some mental ideas to your self. This can be ...


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Or perhaps, could writing down and elaborating grandiose, self-themed stories exacerbate self-grasping which would otherwise be much less? From AN8.35, we have the case of an elaborate grandiose grasping by an ethical persion: The heart’s wish of an ethical person succeeds because of their purity. Next, someone gives to ascetics or brahmins such ...


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OP: Is it possible to have an unaware, unconscious self-grasping (which would here transpire in my stories)? There are 18 internal and external views across past, present and future making a total of 108 views of self rooted in carving. 18 Internal Preoccupations with Craving (1) “I am” (2) “I am this [I am like this]” (3) “Thus am I [I am ...


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If we ask who is the one experiencing the end of suffering, that is like asking how a photon knows to go in a straight line. Both questions result in a tangle of confusion around the concept of identity and knowing. The conventional meaning of "knows" presupposes identity and without identity view, conventional meaning comes up empty. If we step away from ...


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The fear about questions about self is misplaced. What is intended by that admonition is refraining from speculations about the origin or destiny, or existence or non-existence of a self. What the questioner is asking, I believe, is the definition in Buddhism of Self, and that is a legitimate question to ask and answer. The answer is that it is that which ...


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If you ask me, I'd argue that "experiencing not-self" does not have to do that much with an specific feeling or sensation, but rather with a change in our paradigms, mental schemes and world-views. The internalization born from reflection, analysis and meditation allows the mind to change the way it interprets the world and sense-experience. You gradually ...


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When I told my Zen Roshi that "I didn't exist," he simply tapped my leg and said, "What's that?" I was completely baffled and tongue-tied. Welcome to the stream. “Mendicants, all those who have experiential confidence in me have entered the stream. --AN10.64 If the "world seems to be completely neutral and analytic", this can be due to indifference (i.e....


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Anicca is impermanence. Impermanence always ends in Dukka regardless of whether it is pleasant, unpleasant or neutral. FEELINGS Now, ayya, how many kinds of feelings are there?‖ Avuso Visākha, there are these 3 kinds of feelings: pleasant feeling, sukhā vedanā painful feeling, dukkhā vedanā neither pleasant nor painful [neutral] ...


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I think the terms (e.g. anicca and dukkha) are related. And phrases like "Inability to Keep What We Like" seem to be quotes from scripture, so I don't want to say that the phrase is "wrong". But the phrase seems to come from the second noble truth ... Furthermore, bhikkhus, this is the dukkha ariya·sacca: jāti is dukkha, jarā is dukkha (sickness is ...


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I read the following quote: A Buddha is not needed to show that "impermanence" is an inherent characteristic of our universe. Scientists are well aware of that, but they have not attained Nibbāna. Anicca is a deep concept that can be described in many different ways, and they are all related. Here are three ways to look at it: “Anicca – ...


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