Skip to main content
6 votes

Arahants are perfect. Do they realize others are not perfect and they themselves are?

As far as I know, Arahants don't think of themselves as "selves". Instead, they tend to think in terms of qualities and their sources - i.e. "there's this wisdom, it came from study and ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
  • 58.4k
3 votes

Arahants are perfect. Do they realize others are not perfect and they themselves are?

Arahants will not feel proud or conceited. They would feel peace. Regardless of what things they know, whether internal or external, they wouldn’t be proud because of that, for that is not ...
ruben2020's user avatar
  • 37.1k
3 votes

What are some techniques to practice Anatta with the five aggregates?

Yes, the best way to anatta is serenity. Intellectual understanding does not help at all. It can help you remove noise from your life, but the real understanding comes from serenity. When you are ...
ukh's user avatar
  • 435
2 votes

How do I practice not-self or Anatta whilst talking?

Develop awareness through practising vipassana, and overtime you will be able to observe without thinking, and this is the birth of not-self. Everything else is accomplished through continual ...
user2115136's user avatar
2 votes

If I gift money to somebody then am I doing Adhamma?

There are many motivations for giving a gift. Most are selfish, but the best motivation for giving a gift is not selfish. The best motivation for giving a gift is adornment of the mind, which means ...
ruben2020's user avatar
  • 37.1k
2 votes

How does the infinite divine mind (the All) subdivide into self-experiences (atman)?

The Buddha used the word "atta", which merely & simply refers to the mind created "small self" or "ego". For example, as used in the Buddha's second sermon, "...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
  • 41.9k
2 votes
Accepted

Why would form not lead to affliction, if it were self?

Look at it in below order. 1) Level 1 (form) Self: here self mean, you. You can control you, like if you want to raise your hands, you can do it. It means if something is you, you can control it.( ...
Pycm's user avatar
  • 366
1 vote

Arahants are perfect. Do they realize others are not perfect and they themselves are?

I agreed with the OP that the one quality I deeply admired about the Buddha and his arahant monks is that they do not harm themselves or others (as well as other beings). This gift of harmlessness is ...
Desmon's user avatar
  • 1,328
1 vote

How does one reconcile anatta with locus-of-control?

In general, comparative philosophy is not the most productive way to engage with Buddhism. I like how Chogyam Trungpa explained it: when you come to another country, if you really want to understand ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
  • 58.4k
1 vote

How does one reconcile anatta with locus-of-control?

The Buddhist Noble Eightfold Path comprises of Three Trainings: Ethical Conduct Concentration Wisdom that ends suffering, which includes the realisation of Anatta. In respect to ordinary daily/...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
  • 41.9k
1 vote

Why would form not lead to affliction, if it were self?

My understanding is that formal logic is based on definitions or Axioms. All Athenians are liars Mike is an Athenian Therefore Mike is a liar Whether the axioms are wisely-chosen is a different ...
ChrisW's user avatar
  • 46.6k
1 vote

Should one be practicing restraint or be practicing mindfulness?

If Yuttadhammo Bhikkhu says what you wrote, Yuttadhammo Bhikkhu has wrong view. Remaining mindful in Buddhism means to remember to not engage in unwholesome behaviour. For example, the suttas say: ...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
  • 41.9k
1 vote

Should one be practicing restraint or be practicing mindfulness?

I think it's both. "I love this bad habit but I'll try to refrain" may not work very well, in several ways. "I'm mindful that this would be wrong behaviour, therefore I avoid it" ...
ChrisW's user avatar
  • 46.6k
1 vote

If I gift money to somebody then am I doing Adhamma?

The enlightened, such as enlightened monks, require gifts. The unenlightened also require gifts. Also, gifts are required to be given when there is a natural obligation. From the viewpoint of an ...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
  • 41.9k
1 vote
Accepted

If I gift money to somebody then am I doing Adhamma?

I'd guess that it's keeping your money to yourself, not giving, that's more likely to be selfish -- e.g., "this is mine". Actually in my experience, if you give money to someone less wealthy ...
ChrisW's user avatar
  • 46.6k
1 vote

Is Anatta a phenomenon?

Sorry I likely misled you with my previous answer (see below). To be honest I'm not sure, but I would consider this: sabbe dhamma anatta = 'all phenomena are anatta' or 'all phenomena are not atta' So ...
blue_ego's user avatar
  • 1,377
1 vote
Accepted

Is Anatta a phenomenon?

The meanings of the word 'dhamma' are very broad. The root meaning of the word 'dhamma' is 'that which supports'. The word dharma has roots in the Sanskrit dhr-, which means to hold or to support, ...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
  • 41.9k
1 vote

Why is it important to keep away from the doctrines of absolute self and absolute non-self?

Eternalism = permanence of a self Annihilationism = a temporary self bound for eventual annihilation. Anatta = absence of any real self anywhere = absolute not-self
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
  • 41.9k
1 vote
Accepted

How does the self-doer of AN 6.38 not conflict with anatta?

MN 61 says: ‘yannu kho ahaṁ idaṁ kāyena kammaṁ kattukāmo idaṁ me kāyakammaṁ attabyābādhāyapi saṁvatteyya, parabyābādhāyapi saṁvatteyya, ubhayabyābādhāyapi saṁvatteyya— ‘Does this act with the body ...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
  • 41.9k
1 vote

How does the self-doer of AN 6.38 not conflict with anatta?

I believe this talk was given to a brahmin who held the belief that actions are merely actions with no consequences somewhat similar to the doctrine of non-doing. In the case of this brahmin, there ...
Desmon's user avatar
  • 1,328
1 vote

Is there a possibility of a *real* temporary self?

There is no temporary self in Buddhism because self is described in the suttas as: a delusion (moha) a disease (roga) only arising of suffering (dukkhameva uppajjamānaṁ uppajjati) a conceiving (...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
  • 41.9k
1 vote

Identification with form

I can suggest 2 ways to overcome this problem. But first I think we should understand why we feel ashamed or embarrassed with our body. I suspect we tend to feel more conscious of our self-image or ...
Desmon's user avatar
  • 1,328
1 vote

What are some techniques to practice Anatta with the five aggregates?

Thinking 'there's an ear, and it hurts' rather than thinking "my ear hurts" is a proper method. Similarly, viewing anger & fear as merely elements of anger & fear will make them go ...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
  • 41.9k
1 vote

How do I practice not-self or Anatta whilst talking?

While SN 1.25 presents this from the arahant's perspective, SN 22.89 presents this from the stream enterer's perspective. The Venerable Khemaka replied: “These five aggregates subject to clinging ...
ruben2020's user avatar
  • 37.1k
1 vote

How do I practice not-self or Anatta whilst talking?

ChrisW already touched on this in his answer but it is buried in a bunch of other thoughts, so I'll say it here again: It's not as much which words you use, as it is what meanings you convey with the ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
  • 58.4k
1 vote
Accepted

How do I practice not-self or Anatta whilst talking?

SN 5.10 is a very good sutta about the practice not-self or Anatta whilst talking. In SN 5.10, Mara (the Destroyer) approaches an enlightened nun and asks: By whom has this being been created? Where ...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
  • 41.9k
1 vote

What are the traditional Buddhist arguments for rebirth?

I am replacing my previous answer. If my understanding is right, in the school of Advaita Vedanta in Hinduism, idol worship is seen as a step for elementary practitioners, before they are able to ...
ruben2020's user avatar
  • 37.1k
1 vote

Have any Buddhist thinkers responded to the critique of the Brahma Sutras?

This answer is written with reference to Brahma Sutras with commentary by Adi Shankara (BSSB), translated by Swami Vireshwarananda (1936). The Brahma Sutras are too cryptic to be understood without a ...
ruben2020's user avatar
  • 37.1k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible