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Ambient light perceptions are impermanent and should simply be observed: SN22.102:1.2: “Mendicants, when the perception of impermanence is developed and cultivated it eliminates all desire for sensual pleasures, for rebirth in the realm of luminous form, and for rebirth in a future life. It eliminates all ignorance and eradicates all conceit ‘I am’ Since ...


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The key phrase in your question is "I sometimes doubt [...]". The "I" in this phrase is your mind entering to question your meditation practice, because that's what the thinking mind does: it looks for problems to worry about so that it can keep itself active. There are three things you can do about it, depending on your inclinations: ...


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For starters, be aware that anapana-sati (breath meditation remembrance) as defined in the suttas is quite a different practice. As this is a forum about Buddhism in general, it would be helpful if you designate what tradition you're practicing "anapana". Most people I would think, would assume when you say 'anapana', you're referring to sutta ...


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As other answers hinted at, you having these worries and doubts about your experiences and what they mean, is a sure sign that you got too obsessed with the concept of progress. This concept is just an idea in your head, a kind of hook you are on. Paradoxically, the only way to get to the next level is to drop this notion of levels and progress altogether. ...


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We don't care about nimitta or ambient light. We care only the breaths. The nimitta or ambient light is naturally appearing at focusing the breath. Thinking of light or nimitta is not thinking of breaths. Thinking out of breath is losing the meditation. Focus on the breaths. Don't think of nimitta or ambient light, although it is appearing so shiny. When ...


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