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The study of general and fundamental problems, such as those connected with reality, existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind and language. It can also be a theory or attitude that acts as a guiding principle for behaviour.

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The study material of the 'basic-program' provided by the FPMT covers a great deal, but (1) what it covers also depends on the teachings and commentaries you follow (2) and it is a specific traditions …
answered Feb 14 '16 by Tenzin Dorje
3
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Svabhāva stands for inherent existence. From an early Madhyamika viewpoint, there are two types of dependent-arising: Causal dependence Dependence on parts While impermanent phenomena depend on b …
answered Feb 13 '18 by Tenzin Dorje
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There are different interpretations of Candrakirti, even among Madhyamika-Prasangika scholars. That said, Prasangika scholars generally hold that Buddhapālita (470 AD - 550 AD) gave the first Prasangi …
answered Dec 22 '15 by Tenzin Dorje
3
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According to Madhyamika, whatever is dependent-arising is empty of svabhāva. As Nagarjuna says, the meaning of emptiness is dependent-arising; and dependent-arising is the meaning of emptiness. Each a …
answered Feb 13 '18 by Tenzin Dorje
5
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It is a topic expounded in: philosophical texts classifications and presentations of tenets (Tib. grub mtha') In several instances, "reality" refers to "ultimate truth". You will find it so meanin …
answered Oct 2 '15 by Tenzin Dorje
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Since this question is epistemological, I will speak of knowers rather than objects of knowledge. The Mahayana abhidharma defines seven types of consciousnesses. Lati Rinpoche says: There are thr …
answered May 31 '16 by Tenzin Dorje
2
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Madhyamika posits that both persons and phenomena (i.e. phenomena other than persons) are empty of true existence. While traditional text do not mention the emptiness of chairs, table, etc. They do sa …
answered Feb 6 '18 by Tenzin Dorje
4
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This is a question related to Lo-Rig, the study on valid cognition, 'epistemology'. An authoritative and simple text on the topic is Mind in Tibetan Buddhism, by Lati Rinpoche. To answer in a practic …
answered Dec 1 '15 by Tenzin Dorje
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A relatively easy source on that is Unique Tenets of The Middle Way Consequence School, by Daniel Cozort. Better ones are Khedrup Je's Dose of Emptiness, and Shantideva's Bodhisattva Deeds. Vaïbashik …
answered Dec 15 '15 by Tenzin Dorje
5
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There is a similar question here: What is the starting of Samsara?. I would be surprised if there was any Buddhist reference supporting Schopenhauer's claim that "the world came into being as a resul …
answered Jan 18 '17 by Tenzin Dorje
3
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In the Indo-Tibetan traditions, questions such as "what are the sutras of definite meaning? in what way are they different from sutras of interpretative, provisional meaning? what makes them sutras of …
answered Jul 30 '16 by Tenzin Dorje
4
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Vajrasattva did not live in the sense you mean, because he is not a person, but he is an existent. I will explain further: The form body (Rupakaya), is divided in two: The emanation body (Nirmanaka …
answered Dec 28 '15 by Tenzin Dorje
4
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3answers
Tibetan texts that belong to the genre of tenets (doctrinal classification) usually claim that the Cittamatra school refutes external existence. These texts further claim that Cittamatrin posit that ' …
asked Jan 21 '16 by Tenzin Dorje
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Generally, "a phenomenological perspective" refers to phenomenology as expounded by Husserl, and so forth. It is a way of speaking that is typical of contemporary students. It refers to a perspective …
answered Dec 21 '15 by Tenzin Dorje
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specifics, literally it translates fuel. The Tibetan for substantial cause is nyer len. In 'Buddhist Philosophy: Losang Gönchok’s Short Commentary to Jamyang Shayba’s Root Text on Tenets, by Daniel …
answered Apr 19 '18 by Tenzin Dorje