Questions tagged [dukkha]

Dukkha (Pāli; Sanskrit: duḥkha; Tibetan: སྡུག་བསྔལ་ sdug bsngal, pr. "duk-ngel") is a Buddhist term commonly translated as "suffering", "anxiety", "stress", or "unsatisfactoriness". The principle of dukkha is one of the most important concepts in the Buddhist tradition. The Buddha is reputed to have said: "I have taught one thing and one thing only, dukkha and the cessation of dukkha."

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6
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4answers
742 views

'Dukkha': What is the difference between 'suffering' & 'unsatisfactoriness'?

In Buddhism, the English words 'suffering' & 'unsatisfactoriness' are often used as translations of the Pali word 'dukkha'. What is the difference between 'suffering' & 'unsatisfactoriness'?
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4answers
794 views

Sequence in the noble eightfold path

It's clear right view is the foremost factor as without the right view one would not go for practicing the noble eightfold path at all. But when the rest is considered, is there a real sequence? My ...
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4answers
144 views

Is dukkha conventional or ultimate? Is it different from the other two marks of existence?

Is the existence of dukkha a conventional or ultimate truth? I am confused, because on the one hand, it is usually mentioned together with two other marks of existence, which clearly look like the ...
2
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3answers
2k views

Two-arrows paradigm (Sallatha Sutta) -- in the Mahayana?

The Sallatha Sutta (SN 36.6) in the Pali Canon is well-known in the Theravada and MBI (mindfulness-based-intervention -- MBSR, MBCT, etc) worlds for the two-arrows paradigm. The first arrow is a ...
3
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4answers
289 views

Translating "dukkha" as "reactivity"

Daniel Brown, on p. 6 of Pointing Out the Great Way, says this (emphasis added)... The Pali word typically translated as “suffering” is dukkha, which could also be rendered as “reactivity.” For, ...
7
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5answers
434 views

How does the first noble truth associate dukkha with each of the five skandhas?

I'm looking at this definition of dukkha: Birth is dukkha, aging is dukkha, death is dukkha; sorrow, lamentation, pain, grief, & despair are dukkha; association with the unbeloved is ...
5
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5answers
1k views

Zen & Dukkha -- Is Everything Suffering?

Thich Nhat Hanh seems to deny a major teaching on dukkha/suffering common to both Theravada and Tibetan teachings -- the idea of all-perasive suffering ("the suffering of composite things",...
3
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3answers
490 views

Two interpretations of the three levels of suffering, Dukkha Sutta and Tibetan

There's a wrinkle in the teachings about the three levels of suffering. The Pali Canon, in SN 38.14 -- Dukkha Sutta -- has it thus (leaving things uninterpreted for the moment): the suffering of pain ...
2
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3answers
259 views

What is the meaning of *suffering*?

What is the meaning of the word suffering or (pali) dukkha when it is referred to in topics around Dhamma and Vinaya or Buddhism?
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4answers
501 views

What force keeps you bonded to samsara?

Superficially, people say that there are a lot of people who love them (and vice versa), but if you analyze your life, you will find that there is no such thing as true love. I've realized that what ...
5
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4answers
560 views

Am I "fooling" myself?

As I practice more and more on seeing life as Dukkha, something interesting happens. I feel a greater sense of gratitude and contentment. I am not talking about seeing things as they are directly ...
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2answers
130 views

Is ignorance/unawareness Dukkha?

It is usually said that the root delusions of attachment, anger and unawareness/ignorance are the causes of Dukkha. Of the three, unawareness/ignorance is the root cause. I see very how unawareness/...
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9answers
1k views

Are Buddhists happier people?

The First Noble Truth says that cyclic existence is Dukkha. I'm not in a position to expound on the meaning of the word Dukkha, but I think everyone can agree it does not mean "happines". Still, I ...
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4answers
136 views

Do you become unhappy when happiness disappears?

Do you become unhappy when happiness disappears? Or is there some other state of mind between happiness and unhappiness?
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6answers
2k views

Difference between Samsara and Dukkha

What is the difference between the terms "samsara" and "dukkha"? What is the relationship between the two?
7
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4answers
475 views

Is it necessary for a Buddhist to believe that existence is suffering?

It appears that Buddhism depends on a central premise -- that all worldly existence = suffering / dukkha. Are there Buddhist teachers or traditions that teach a joyous approach to worldly life? Are ...
4
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2answers
124 views

Doing versus not doing what others tell you to do

Is not doing what others tell you to do a wholesome or unwholesome act? When someone tells you to do something, and you decline, when it's a wholesome act and when it's an unwholesome act from your ...
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15answers
6k views

Did the Buddha really say that "life is suffering"?

I often see the first noble truth (duḥkha) stated as "life is suffering". I have yet to come across a passage in a Buddhist text which phrases it like this - mostly they don't talk about "life" in ...
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3answers
444 views

Are practical solutions to everyday suffering that contradict Buddhism Upaya or avidya?

If we are caught in the great web of desire and aversion, and are roiling in Samsara, helpful or well meaning advise (to let go, to be in the moment, to inspect the emptiness of reality, to not ...

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