Questions tagged [dukkha]

Dukkha (Pāli; Sanskrit: duḥkha; Tibetan: སྡུག་བསྔལ་ sdug bsngal, pr. "duk-ngel") is a Buddhist term commonly translated as "suffering", "anxiety", "stress", or "unsatisfactoriness". The principle of dukkha is one of the most important concepts in the Buddhist tradition. The Buddha is reputed to have said: "I have taught one thing and one thing only, dukkha and the cessation of dukkha."

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8
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9answers
271 views

Are all forms of Dukkha related to a sense of self?

A few days ago I started reading books about Paticcasamuppada because I realized how little and shallow was my understanding on this capital matter. Despite getting the gist of it, I still have ...
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11answers
6k views

Did the Buddha really say that “life is suffering”?

I often see the first noble truth (duḥkha) stated as "life is suffering". I have yet to come across a passage in a Buddhist text which phrases it like this - mostly they don't talk about "life" in ...
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3answers
143 views

Suffering due to non-self-related preconceived notions in Theravada

According to this answer: However, there is another type of suffering that cannot be fixed with anatta! This type of suffering comes from attachment to forms other than oneself, forms that have ...
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5answers
871 views

Zen & Dukkha — Is Everything Suffering?

Thich Nhat Hanh seems to deny a major teaching on dukkha/suffering common to both Theravada and Tibetan teachings -- the idea of all-perasive suffering ("the suffering of composite things",...
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3answers
248 views

What is the meaning of *suffering*?

What is the meaning of the word suffering or (pali) dukkha when it is referred to in topics around Dhamma and Vinaya or Buddhism?
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7answers
362 views

Is “impermanence” a bad translation of “anicca”?

This article explains Anicca, Dukkha, and Anatta -- and in this question I'd like to ask about Anicca. The article says that Anicca doesn't mean, or shouldn't be translated as, "impermanence"...
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5answers
378 views

How does the first noble truth associate dukkha with each of the five skandhas?

I'm looking at this definition of dukkha: Birth is dukkha, aging is dukkha, death is dukkha; sorrow, lamentation, pain, grief, & despair are dukkha; association with the unbeloved is ...
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4answers
632 views

Sequence in the noble eightfold path

It's clear right view is the foremost factor as without the right view one would not go for practicing the noble eightfold path at all. But when the rest is considered, is there a real sequence? My ...
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5answers
130 views

What do ethical conduct (sila) and compassion have to do with the cessation of dukkha?

As I understand the Third Noble Truth, the cessation of dukkha is brought about by ending craving. I can see how, for example, practicing renunciation, or seeing no self, assist us in achieving this, ...
2
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3answers
272 views

What's the relation between feelings of neither-pleasure-nor-pain and ignorance?

I often see in some suttas that there are some habitual tendencies that, after the arising of pleasent feeling or painful feelings, lead to suffering due to passion for the pleasure and aversion for ...
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4answers
204 views

What enters the mind of an idle Buddha?

What enters the mind of a Buddha when left idle? Suppose a Buddha were confined to a hospital bed or prison cell. One cannot remain within the conditioned states of jhana indefinitely. If one is ...
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9answers
1k views

Are Buddhists happier people?

The First Noble Truth says that cyclic existence is Dukkha. I'm not in a position to expound on the meaning of the word Dukkha, but I think everyone can agree it does not mean "happines". Still, I ...
2
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6answers
2k views

Difference between Samsara and Dukkha

What is the difference between the terms "samsara" and "dukkha"? What is the relationship between the two?
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4answers
406 views

What is the most accurate translation of the word 'dukkha'?

This question is a sequel to my previous question about First Noble Truth. It seems that there is discord about the exact rendering of the word 'dukkha'. Sorry if I sound like a pedantic dou*h. I am ...
8
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3answers
428 views

Are practical solutions to everyday suffering that contradict Buddhism Upaya or avidya?

If we are caught in the great web of desire and aversion, and are roiling in Samsara, helpful or well meaning advise (to let go, to be in the moment, to inspect the emptiness of reality, to not ...
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4answers
460 views

Is it necessary for a Buddhist to believe that existence is suffering?

It appears that Buddhism depends on a central premise -- that all worldly existence = suffering / dukkha. Are there Buddhist teachers or traditions that teach a joyous approach to worldly life? Are ...
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3answers
409 views

Two interpretations of the three levels of suffering, Dukkha Sutta and Tibetan

There's a wrinkle in the teachings about the three levels of suffering. The Pali Canon, in SN 38.14 -- Dukkha Sutta -- has it thus (leaving things uninterpreted for the moment): the suffering of pain ...
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5answers
340 views

Is there a kind of consulting service in Buddhism?

Similarly to psychotherapy counselling/consulting service, is there an equivalent form in Buddhism, in that the counselor is trained in Buddhism instead of clinical psychology? I haven't heard of such ...
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6answers
261 views

Happiness, rebirth, and the death of an arahant

I am new to Buddhism and have a question I am hoping someone can answer. My understanding is that realizing enlightenment is universally desirable. In other words, it is considered “better” to ...
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4answers
129 views

What is Aarya dukkha Sacca?

In buddhism what is aarya dukkha? And what’s the reason for it? Dukkha is one of four noble truth. And as I heard it’s because of the impermanence. Can in permanence be the cause for the Dukkha? Is ...