Questions tagged [dukkha]

Dukkha (Pāli; Sanskrit: duḥkha; Tibetan: སྡུག་བསྔལ་ sdug bsngal, pr. "duk-ngel") is a Buddhist term commonly translated as "suffering", "anxiety", "stress", or "unsatisfactoriness". The principle of dukkha is one of the most important concepts in the Buddhist tradition. The Buddha is reputed to have said: "I have taught one thing and one thing only, dukkha and the cessation of dukkha."

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Does duḥkha apply to animals too?

Life is inherently full of suffering. I wonder if the concept of dukkha applies to non-human animals.
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How to get along

As we all know, Harmony in the Sangha is one of the most important attributes of the practicing community which necessarily live and work together. Yet, it is almost inevitable for people - ...
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207 views

Are there anything to care about in this universe?

Due to impermanance of everything, Are there anything to be happy or sad about ? Even about dhamma ? If something seems like to be happy, there are some reasons to not to be happy. It is impermanant ...
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Buddhism broke up my marriage

The title is provocative but sums up my problem: when I am immersed in Buddhist thought, I can no longer love my wife. Buddhism clearly contradicts romantic love. It tolerates it up to a certain ...
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8answers
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How could the Buddha know that he had attained enlightenment when he didn't know what it was?

Having learned and gained complete mastery from the two most famous teachers of his time, he decided to apply extreme austerities for some six years. With these skills acquired, driving a powerful ...
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Anicca, dukkha, Buddhism and depressive nihilism

(English is not my mother tongue, sorry in advance if I make mistakes) I am currently reading a philosophical book that I stumbled upon by chance, a unique work by a young (23yo) Italian of the early ...
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Is suffering always present?

I'm reading Thich Nhat Hanh's "The heart of the Buddhist teaching". When discussing the three dharma seals he talks about misconceptions of suffering. He says that teachings where suffering is ...
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How do you contemplate delight you get due to action that leads to detachment?

Let us follow the unbeaten track, the dukkha in right action. You see a man in need, you feel compassion, wishing him well you help him with his worldly need, then you feel delighted of your action....
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Domanassa & Dukkha in enlightened beings?

What is the difference between domanassa & dukkha? Does domanassa arise in enlightened beings? Does bodily dukkha arise in enlightened beings?
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In Dependent Co-Arising, is Dukkha a Sankhara, a Vedana, both, or none?

How should I understand dukkha (in all its amplitude and semantic complexity), if I want to see it through the lens of Dependent Co-Arising? Where is it classified, apart from the final nidana? Is ...
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Do the specific historical past events play any role in the analysis of the conditions leading to suffering?

As far as I've studied the suttas (not very much, to be honest), it seems that whenever dukkha is analysed and reflected upon, it is mostly done in terms of the phenomena as they arise in the present. ...
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Is Jhana considered dukkha and/or conditioned?

Is the experience of jhana considered dukkha because of its impermanence? If yes, is it still considered dukkha after attaining Nibbana? Is the experience of jhana conditioned? Is it still considered ...
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Is “impermanence” a bad translation of “anicca”?

This article explains Anicca, Dukkha, and Anatta -- and in this question I'd like to ask about Anicca. The article says that Anicca doesn't mean, or shouldn't be translated as, "impermanence"...
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What is the Reason for Noble Dukkha and How? [duplicate]

The direct answer to this question is attachment (upadana). To be more specific my question is how attachment become the cause for the Noble Dukkha? Eg: If I like a car, its an attachment. And how ...
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What is Aarya dukkha Sacca?

In buddhism what is aarya dukkha? And what’s the reason for it? Dukkha is one of four noble truth. And as I heard it’s because of the impermanence. Can in permanence be the cause for the Dukkha? Is ...
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What does 'Ignorance' mean in Dependent Co-Arising?

A while ago I wrote a question here about the relation between dukkha and the sense of self (whether from identity view, from conceit or both). There, most answers said that, indeed, that sense of ...
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Are all forms of Dukkha related to a sense of self?

A few days ago I started reading books about Paticcasamuppada because I realized how little and shallow was my understanding on this capital matter. Despite getting the gist of it, I still have ...
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259 views

Happiness, rebirth, and the death of an arahant

I am new to Buddhism and have a question I am hoping someone can answer. My understanding is that realizing enlightenment is universally desirable. In other words, it is considered “better” to ...
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What's the relation between feelings of neither-pleasure-nor-pain and ignorance?

I often see in some suttas that there are some habitual tendencies that, after the arising of pleasent feeling or painful feelings, lead to suffering due to passion for the pleasure and aversion for ...
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Is there a kind of consulting service in Buddhism?

Similarly to psychotherapy counselling/consulting service, is there an equivalent form in Buddhism, in that the counselor is trained in Buddhism instead of clinical psychology? I haven't heard of such ...
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If all that is impermanent is unsatisfactory, then is all that is permanent satisfactory?

If all that has a beginning and an ending is impermanent and therefore unsatisfactory, then (with binary logic) that which has no beginning and no ending is permanent and satisfactory. Is this right ...
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What to do when it itching (according to suttas and your own experience)?

I know the question may seems a little trivial and superfluous, but rather than being interested in the itching itself, I'd like to know what to do when any kind of unpleasent feeling rises. I think ...
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What did Siddhartha really meant by ending suffering

I constantly hear from buddhists that "happiness is inside of you" and that thinking you can get away from suffering by wanting to be somewhere else, or wanting to be with someone else or stuff like ...
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What is the root condition for (each of the) unwholesome roots of greed, ill-will and delusion (raga, dosa, moha)?

Would it be helpful, wholesome, skillful and wise to investigate the root condition of (each of) the three poisons/unwholesome roots of greed, ill-will and delusion (raga, dosa, moha)? [Why these ...
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Dukkha Nana - deep knowledge of our own suffering

In which school of Buddism is dukkha nana a recognised term? Where is dukkha nana discussed in the Pali canon? The nearest I can find to dukkha nana is klesha-mara which maybe related in some way. ...
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How can I smile when existence itself is dukkha?

I see many monks smiling ,which is a good thing, but logically speaking how can they smile when they know life is dukkha. Can you smile when you are watching somebody getting tortured ? My question ...
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Suffering due to non-self-related preconceived notions in Theravada

According to this answer: However, there is another type of suffering that cannot be fixed with anatta! This type of suffering comes from attachment to forms other than oneself, forms that have ...
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What do ethical conduct (sila) and compassion have to do with the cessation of dukkha?

As I understand the Third Noble Truth, the cessation of dukkha is brought about by ending craving. I can see how, for example, practicing renunciation, or seeing no self, assist us in achieving this, ...
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How does the 2nd Noble truth explain the cause of suffering-as-suffering (e.g. resulting from a severe burn)?

I would like to ask question regarding the 4 Noble Truths. The second Noble Truth broadly speaking is that suffering is a result of craving, aversion and ignorance. I can see how this can been seen as ...
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Common denominator between forms of happiness included in dukkha

What is the common denominator between the happiness derived from family life and the happiness derived from being a recluse?
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Where does Gautam Buddha say so?

I want details of following quote by Gautam Buddha. Can anyone tell where (reference) & what completely he said?
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Why activity makes me material & full of desires?

I am in very dilemma- When I am inactive or lazy I meditate well, read good religious books etc. But whenever I come into action like studies or useful work I become very material & also get ...
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Daily life is dukkha

When I wake in the morning I have noticed that in that first moment when I realise I am conscious I feel this kind of yuckiness or sinking feeling. I'm not sure quite how to describe it. I guess it's ...
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Dukkha and happiness

Was reading the article linked to below about how happiness is merely the absence of dukkha in much the same way that darkness is the absence of light. That happiness is alway there. All we need to ...
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Are 'elements' defined as non-suffering?

I'd like to question something from this answer without disputing it, i.e. there was a phrase it in which I found novel: You do this by seeing that your suffering is impermanent and empty (...
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How do Buddhists handle mental illness such as depression or bipolar disorder?

How is mental health dealt with by Bhuddists? Is it believed to be a tangible issue e.g. imbalances of chemicals in the brain? Or an issue of the spirit (not sure if spirit is the right word)? Is ...
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487 views

The question of why do we have craving

In Buddhism everything boils down to we as humans and animals crave. Craving is the root cause for suffering and rebirth. So the question becomes why are we hard coded to crave. Is there any ...
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Does dukkha apply to name-and-form?

That is to say, anicca and anatta obviously apply to all 5 skandhas, but 'stress/suffering' is a psychological phenomenon. Is it the 'name' within name-and-form that links it back to dukkha?
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Is smoking tobacco acceptable in any school of Buddhism?

Is smoking tobacco acceptable in any school of Buddhism? I think it shouldn't be considered acceptable: because of the fifth precept because of the first precept (smoking is physically harmful, so ...
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What enters the mind of an idle Buddha?

What enters the mind of a Buddha when left idle? Suppose a Buddha were confined to a hospital bed or prison cell. One cannot remain within the conditioned states of jhana indefinitely. If one is ...
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'Dukkha': What is the difference between 'suffering' & 'unsatisfactoriness'?

In Buddhism, the English words 'suffering' & 'unsatisfactoriness' are often used as translations of the Pali word 'dukkha'. What is the difference between 'suffering' & 'unsatisfactoriness'?
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Sequence in the noble eightfold path

It's clear right view is the foremost factor as without the right view one would not go for practicing the noble eightfold path at all. But when the rest is considered, is there a real sequence? My ...
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Is dukkha conventional or ultimate? Is it different from the other two marks of existence?

Is the existence of dukkha a conventional or ultimate truth? I am confused, because on the one hand, it is usually mentioned together with two other marks of existence, which clearly look like the ...
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Two-arrows paradigm (Sallatha Sutta) — in the Mahayana?

The Sallatha Sutta (SN 36.6) in the Pali Canon is well-known in the Theravada and MBI (mindfulness-based-intervention -- MBSR, MBCT, etc) worlds for the two-arrows paradigm. The first arrow is a ...
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Translating “dukkha” as “reactivity”

Daniel Brown, on p. 6 of Pointing Out the Great Way, says this (emphasis added)... The Pali word typically translated as “suffering” is dukkha, which could also be rendered as “reactivity.” For, ...
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How does the first noble truth associate dukkha with each of the five skandhas?

I'm looking at this definition of dukkha: Birth is dukkha, aging is dukkha, death is dukkha; sorrow, lamentation, pain, grief, & despair are dukkha; association with the unbeloved is ...
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Zen & Dukkha — Is Everything Suffering?

Thich Nhat Hanh seems to deny a major teaching on dukkha/suffering common to both Theravada and Tibetan teachings -- the idea of all-perasive suffering ("the suffering of composite things",...
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Two interpretations of the three levels of suffering, Dukkha Sutta and Tibetan

There's a wrinkle in the teachings about the three levels of suffering. The Pali Canon, in SN 38.14 -- Dukkha Sutta -- has it thus (leaving things uninterpreted for the moment): the suffering of pain ...
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What is the meaning of *suffering*?

What is the meaning of the word suffering or (pali) dukkha when it is referred to in topics around Dhamma and Vinaya or Buddhism?
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What force keeps you bonded to samsara?

Superficially, people say that there are a lot of people who love them (and vice versa), but if you analyze your life, you will find that there is no such thing as true love. I've realized that what ...