Questions tagged [abhidhamma]

Abhidharma (Sanskrit) or Abhidhamma (Pali) are ancient (3rd century BCE and later) Buddhist texts which contain detailed scholastic reworkings of doctrinal material appearing in the Buddhist sutras, according to schematic classifications. The Abhidhamma works do not contain systematic philosophical treatises, but summaries or abstract and systematic lists.

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Could Lobha(craving) and Dosa(aversion) be working in tandem?

Is wishing for a pain to go away an instance of aversion(Dosa) or an instance of craving(Lobha)? Or both working in tandem? ex: leg pain while doing sitting meditation. Aversion is obvious, if the ...
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Teachings regarding Veneration/Respect (as one of the traditional 10 meritorious deeds)

Feel invited or maybe even inspired to share any teachings regarding "Apacāyana" (Respect or Veneration). It is one of the less taught, but very basic and fundamental, meritorious deeds. Teachings ...
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367 views

Conventional versus Ultimate

People sometimes qualify their statements, by adding the word, "conventionally" — and people distinguish between Conventional Truth (Sammuti Sacca) versus Ultimate Truth (Paramattha Sacca). ...
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What does the Abhidhamma say about impermanence?

I understand the state of changing (impermanence) mentioned in Buddhism, but I have also heard that another more complex version (of the doctrine of impermanence) exists in the Abhidhamma. I would ...
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Conceptual reality, mettā, ignorance

According to some commentaries/abhidhamma, all unwholesome states are rooted in ignorance; that ignorance is, according to Pa Auk Sayadaw, the ignorance that sees things as concepts, e.g., a man a ...
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Can we be sensously aware without consciousness?

I wondered (after this thread) what Buddhists have said about this question. Can anyone, monks, Buddhas, ordinary people, be aware of a sensation without consciousness of it? And moreover to link it ...
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What's the (mental) quality different between aversive leaving (vi-bhava) and renouncing (nekkhamma)?

Whats the different between leaving, abounding, letting go, push away, say out of aversion, anger, and renouncing? Both seems to be combined with tanha (thirst), yet one is called ku-sala (bad-...
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What are Bhavanga and Javana?

Will someone explain Bhavanga and Javana in simple way? At times, they seem non-comprehensible.
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Scientific approach of Kamma

The concept of Kamma implies that information is stored in the mind (not the brain) and after the being is dead, this mind (or this data "storage") goes on and carries with it the current position of ...
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446 views

Consciousness in Nibbana

In the Abhidhamma, it makes mention to 89 and 121 states of consciousness. It says there are four ultimate realities namely Consciousness Mental Factors Matter Nibbana. The first three are ...
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Text request--Abhidhamma

I am looking for a legal, online version of the Abhidhamma in English. Can anyone point me towards some good online sources, especially for the major books of the Abhidhamma?
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104 views

What are the 10 sammādiṭṭhis, ten right views?

Maybe a challenging questions for the scholars and literary Abhidhamma-fans, with much possibilities for great merits: What are the 10 sammādiṭṭhis, ten right views? Deatal explaining of each would ...
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How is re-linking consciousness reconciled with MN 38?

In the essay "Buddhist Reflections on Death", V.F. Gunaratna wrote: The terminal thought goes through the same stages of progress as any other thought, with this differences that whereas the ...
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Without an enduring quid between lifes, how to explain past life recalling?

How a being (be it a Buddha) can remember its past lives, if there is no "quid"/soul/self enduring for more time?
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132 views

What's the difference between remorse and shame of evil?

Remorse or regret (kukucca) is supposed to be unwholesome, while shame of evil (hiri) is wholesome. What is the difference between the two? Why is one wholesome, while the other isn't?