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The Noble Truths make us aware that the cause of suffering is desire. Isn't it a desire to become enlightened and attain Nirvana; thus, causes suffering? If you drop the desire, will it be possible to attain Nirvana, or for that matter, do anything at all?

"And this, monks, is the noble truth of the origination of stress: the craving that makes for further becoming — accompanied by passion & delight, relishing now here & now there — i.e., craving for sensual pleasure, craving for becoming, craving for non-becoming." -The Buddha (Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta)

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Desire is used to fabricate all the needed conditions to abandon desire once and for all.

Desire should be dropped at the right time, after all the conditions for attaining Nibbana are generated. But it is used until that point.

So desire is used to abandon desire.

Brahmana Sutta: To Unnabha the Brahman http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn51/sn51.015.than.html

"Brahman, the holy life is lived under the Blessed One with the aim of abandoning desire."

"Is there a path, is there a practice, for the abandoning of that desire?"

"Yes, there is a path, there is a practice, for the abandoning of that desire."

"What is the path, the practice, for the abandoning of that desire?"

"Brahman, there is the case where a monk develops the base of power endowed with concentration founded on desire & the fabrications of exertion. He develops the base of power endowed with concentration founded on persistence... concentration founded on intent... concentration founded on discrimination & the fabrications of exertion. This, Brahman, is the path, this is the practice for the abandoning of that desire."

"If that's so, Master Ananda, then it's an endless path, and not one with an end, for it's impossible that one could abandon desire by means of desire."

"In that case, brahman, let me question you on this matter. Answer as you see fit. What do you think: Didn't you first have desire, thinking, 'I'll go to the park,' and then when you reached the park, wasn't that particular desire allayed?"

"Yes, sir."

"Didn't you first have persistence, thinking, 'I'll go to the park,' and then when you reached the park, wasn't that particular persistence allayed?"

"Yes, sir."

"Didn't you first have the intent, thinking, 'I'll go to the park,' and then when you reached the park, wasn't that particular intent allayed?"

"Yes, sir."

"Didn't you first have [an act of] discrimination, thinking, 'I'll go to the park,' and then when you reached the park, wasn't that particular act of discrimination allayed?"

"Yes, sir."

"So it is with an arahant whose mental effluents are ended, who has reached fulfillment, done the task, laid down the burden, attained the true goal, totally destroyed the fetter of becoming, and who is released through right gnosis. Whatever desire he first had for the attainment of arahantship, on attaining arahantship that particular desire is allayed. Whatever persistence he first had for the attainment of arahantship, on attaining arahantship that particular persistence is allayed. Whatever intent he first had for the attainment of arahantship, on attaining arahantship that particular intent is allayed. Whatever discrimination he first had for the attainment of arahantship, on attaining arahantship that particular discrimination is allayed. So what do you think, brahman? Is this an endless path, or one with an end?"

"You're right, Master Ananda. This is a path with an end, and not an endless one. Magnificent, Master Ananda! Magnificent! Just as if he were to place upright what was overturned, to reveal what was hidden, to show the way to one who was lost, or to carry a lamp into the dark so that those with eyes could see forms, in the same way has Master Ananda — through many lines of reasoning — made the Dhamma clear. I go to Master Gotama for refuge, to the Dhamma, and to the Sangha of monks. May Master Ananda remember me as a lay follower who has gone for refuge, from this day forward, for life."

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Desire puts you on the path leading to attainment of Nirvana. When you walk down the path towards Nirvana, you gain knowledge on cessation of desires. When all your desires cease, including the desire that put you on the path leading to Nirvana, Nirvana is attained.

When Nirvana is attained, right action and wrong action is fully known. Thus, after attaining Nirvana, one still has to do right action until death in order to attain Nibbana.

To do right action until death, right desire is needed. Right desire is the way towards Nibbana. Just as desire lead you to Nirvana, right desire will lead you to Nibbana. When your time comes, all desires, including the right desires that put you on the path leading to Nibbana, will cease and Nibbana will come to fruition.

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Good Question :)

I'm only speaking from my own experience but I think that it is important to first properly define 'desire'. The term 'desire' in Buddhism, refers to one's state of being that wishes for satisfaction that is out of their "current" state of being. For example, a person wishes for pizza when they are given a hamburger. Interestingly, this also applies to one who wishes for tranquility during meditation. The key here however, is that one is 'unsatisfied' with what they currently have. So your question is definitely correct saying that the desire for nirvana causes suffering. Ironically though, I doubt you would even be practicing if it weren't for the shinny appeal of enlightenment or nirvana. Not to stress though, it is fine to want to be peaceful and tranquil :). You just have to change your view so that it correctly corresponds to this wish. Try improving your natural environment and supporting your family and loved ones.

Hope this helps :)

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