2

What is the right way of living in the Present?

Present day living is full of challenges and with forces in play and to act in certain way. How does one follow the Path in these conditions without incurring karma and its after-effects?

  • Hello and welcome to Buddhism.SE. We've put together some information to help you get started here. – Robin111 Jun 11 '15 at 12:24
  • Just amending the title to make it more descriptive. Please roll back if the new title is not suitable – Crab Bucket Jun 11 '15 at 21:02
4

For me, the challenges of living mindfully are related to wandering from the precepts. I get bogged down in work, driving, shopping, life in general... and just forget. One tool I've found useful is chants -- I start each day listening to, and mumbling to myself, the 3 gems and 5 precepts chants. Those tend to "stick" in my mind, and I hear them in my mind throughout the day, which helps me remember to guide my mind away from work, driving, shopping, etc... and back to the present moment!

  • Hello and welcome to Buddhism.SE. We've put together some information to help you get started here. – Robin111 Jun 11 '15 at 17:07
4

One piece of advice is to avoid planning for the future and dwelling on the past and instead focus your attention on your senses to observe your environment. I recall once I was feeling anxious and depressed and just happened to be taking out the trash—just walking outside, feeling the breeze and sun, hearing the birds, smelling the fresh air, seeing the blue sky, I laughed and smiled and immediately I felt uplifted. Having spent so much time in my apartment, I was almost numb to my environment, which promoted neurotic thinking. Moving my awareness to nature so that I had more stimulation in the present helped me to be more in the now, as it were, so that my mind was not stuck in the past or future. It was one of those "looking at the flower and laughing" realizations for me.

4

Approach each moment with the intent to live a more full, complete life with same intention and attention that you showed while asking this question.

A willingness to question your sense of what you are experiencing and a desire to grow into a deeper understanding of yourself and the Dharma and others in your life are good starting points. If you have access to a sangha of some sort, in the town of your current home, online, etc, meeting with that group can offer more examples of a life that best suits your needs.

I hope this helps answer your question.

1

How does one follow the Path in these conditions without incurring karma and its after-effects?

Karma and its after-effects will occur until one becomes an Arahant and thereby breaks the last 5 fetters, i.e. "Craving for fine material existence, Craving for existence on the level of formlessness, Conceit, Restlessness and Ignorance".

Until then, every moment is either a "kamma-making-moment" or a "kamma-receiving-moment".

Following the path is not different in these conditions. The experiences are still the same, i.e. hearing, seeing, tasting, feeling, smelling and thinking. That is the same whether one is living a rich life, a poor life, if one is healthy, dying etc. The experiences don't change. Its still just the 6 sense-experiences occurring incessantly.

What is the right way of living in the Present?

Be ever mindful. Always be vigilant. Be mindful of mental and physical phenomena as they arise and pass away in the present moment. Be with reality as it is, when it is and eventually one will set oneself free.

0

I do agree and like @Lanka answers; "every moment is either a "kamma-making-moment" or a "kamma-receiving-moment"."

Yes. It is the way we living. As you describe in your question: "Present day living is full of challenges" That present day could be the result of what you done before, that challenges will something of what you did yesterday, and what can make you who you are by doing what you think you have to do.

So you simply follow you daily kinda works, saying what you have to say... Every single moment is Karma, and I believe it is also belongs to every human being, not only to Buddhist.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.