-4

I think that the following from Nietzsche is the right way to live.

I love him who reserves no share of spirit for himself, but wants to be wholly the spirit of his virtue: thus he walks as spirit over the bridge.

And the right way to die is:

I love him whose soul is deep even in the wounding, and may perish through a small matter: thus he goes willingly over the bridge.

Can the former zeal be brought to meditation? Can the latter indifference be brought to life?

closed as off-topic by yuttadhammo Mar 13 '15 at 11:45

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about Buddhist philosophy, teaching, and practice, within the scope defined in the help center." – yuttadhammo
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • awww i thought it was a good question sorry :/ – user3293056 Mar 12 '15 at 0:05
  • 1
    Explanation for my -1: Nietzsche and Western Philosophy are a bit off-topic here, and the question suffers a lot from many of the items listed on: buddhism.stackexchange.com/help/dont-ask . Also, keep in mind that Stack Exchange, by virtue of its origin as a site to help programmers, is biased towards objective questions that have only one answer, or at most only a few correct answers. Granted, someone might still be able to produce a great answer. – Anthony Mar 12 '15 at 2:43
  • 1
    ok we'll see if anything comes up... there have been studied into N. and B.... a few. – user3293056 Mar 12 '15 at 2:52
  • really kinda annoyed at all the topics that have been downvoted and closed since i was last here - admittedly i have nothing to add to your community it seems, but really these aren't horrible questions and the poor voting system has made them seem something other than what they are – user3293056 Jul 4 '15 at 5:09
1

The world (everything that we can percieve) is not we should percieve, as per buddism. But everything that we see and think about that and confirm to ourself (that's what you have taken as Percieved) is not wrong but the present of us (your's, in context of your wish/curiousity to question this). Mr. N. said it in being a no-self, or selflessness. That's a right way of living, but the basic of buddism, the teaching, goes beyond this. I am sure if you will adapt the sayings of Mr. N. then you will see it by yourself that getting a life and a death is not all for what you asked this question. Keep it up the seeker. when you'll get what you seek than you will be so calm, contemplated and relaxed. I wish the best for you.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.