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In Vipassana retreats (as taught by Goenka) there is a relevant emphasis on bodily sensations that may arise.

They first ask you to do Ānāpānasati (to focus on sensations above your upper lip and below your nose, whil breathing) and then to scan your body, with the goal of perceiving sensations that may arise

On the other side, in Zen (soto), at least in my experience, they do not tell you what to focus on, and it seems that there is no emphasis on bodily sensations.

I asked to a Zen meditation teacher if he ever feels something in his body while meditating. His answer was ''No''.

So, my question is

  • How can it be that two traditions have so radical approaches to our body ?
  • Is it true that in Zen there are no stages where bodily sensations arise ?
  • If subtle vibrations arise while doing Zen, what is the right approach to them ? Ignore them ? Analyze them ?
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How can it be that two traditions have so radical approaches to our body ?

They have different teaching methods. Also, zazen is not usually presented with discrete steps (though there are some milestones), as opposed to the original "sati" meditations (anapanasati, satipatthana)

Is it true that in Zen there are no stages where bodily sensations arise ?

I've never heard this said.

If subtle vibrations arise while doing Zen, what is the right approach to them ? Ignore them ? Analyze them ?

The stock phrase in zazen is "you just sit".

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