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I am asking this because now, after three years of daily samatha, I sit between forty-five minutes to an hour. Should I be sitting longer? I stopped timing myself about two years into practice, and generally speaking I sit until I emerge spontaneously from a state of concentration. Unless I am having a particularly difficult session I am rarely aware of the passage of time anyway, but more often than not I eventually just stop chanting and rest for a while in the stillness, and at that point it's like -- I could just sit there indefinitely. There is no reason to keep sitting, let alone a reason to stop.

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I think it's more about quality than quantity. You can sit your entire life and never reach nibanna or you can sit for 5 minutes and reach in an instant. It's more important to be consistent. Continue mindfulness from sitting to standing, to walking to eating to sleeping. Difficult to do in daily life but I find it easier the more retreats I go on. Also make sure to sit for a while when you open your eyes and contemplate the benefits you gained from sitting. Im like you I also prefer not to time these days and feel I could just keep sitting.

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Core Buddhist meditation is not chanting but sitting with mental stillness. The very end of the important Buddhist sutta MN 118 says all meditation qualities are dependent upon the maturation of letting go/surrender. 'Depth' of concentration correlates with calmness. If the mind is not clearly experiencing an increase in calmness with the increase of the length of the practice session then what is called Right Concentration has not yet been developed. You can consider beginning & continuing your meditation session with mental stillness.

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If we assume jhana levels have sometime to do with depth of concentration then we can assume depth is independent of length - right before Buddha passed away he entered jhana and progressed through the levels in what seems like a short period:

DN16:

Then the Buddha entered the first absorption. Emerging from that, he entered the second absorption. Emerging from that, he successively entered into and emerged from the third absorption, the fourth absorption, the dimension of infinite space, the dimension of infinite consciousness, the dimension of nothingness, and the dimension of neither perception nor non-perception. Then he entered the cessation of perception and feeling. Even on his deathbed, the Buddha retains mastery over his mind.

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Then the Buddha emerged from the cessation of perception and feeling and entered the dimension of neither perception nor non-perception. Emerging from that, he successively entered into and emerged from the dimension of nothingness, the dimension of infinite consciousness, the dimension of infinite space, the fourth absorption, the third absorption, the second absorption, and the first absorption. Emerging from that, he successively entered into and emerged from the second absorption and the third absorption. Then he entered the fourth absorption. Emerging from that the Buddha immediately became fully extinguished.

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