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I am trying to work out if the other-dependent nature exists independent of anything that has the other-dependent nature

This claims that the other-dependent nature

is nonexistent in the way it appears

Does that mean it does not exist in what arises?

Arising through dependence on conditions and

Existing through being imagined,

It is therefore called other-dependent

And is said to be merely imaginary.

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9
  • why can't i delete this. annoying
    – returning
    Jan 23 at 8:12
  • i think the answer is completely "no" but thanks anyway
    – returning
    Jan 23 at 11:39
  • For some odd reason, Stack claims ownership of questions asked, but there are some acceptions.
    – Max
    Jan 23 at 12:37
  • 1
    If you can't delete, what's to stop you doing a radical edit? Jan 23 at 16:12
  • why can't i delete this. annoying Perhaps because you're using an "Unregistered" user account. That didn't stop you making 20 edits though, so I don't know. See How do unregistered accounts work? The "user experience" might be better (for you and for other users) if you do "register".
    – ChrisW
    Jan 23 at 17:26

1 Answer 1

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  1. what arises is the other dependent [verse 2]
  2. its nature is the percept [28]
  3. only the percept appears [27]
  4. anything that appears is imagined [4]
  5. the imagined has the false nature of duality [18]
  6. duality is nonexistent [29]

Meaning the nature of what arises has the false nature of something that does not exist, duality: and the other dependent nature must be independent of duality.

I am trying to work out if the other dependent nature exists independent of anything...

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