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Does the buddha ever speak on time? Does he ever say, "...time doesn't matter..."? I have this weird feeling he is said to have spoken that. I don't know in which sutra that is, or it might have been in a dream, but really, I'm not sure where I got the idea. I assume it was in a certain context if it was really said, and that he wasn't dismissing the time element as trivial, such as a lifetime...

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Does the buddha ever speak on time? Does he ever say, "...time doesn't matter..."?

No, if any, He only emphasizes the preciousness of time and how one should not waste it in order to make progress on the Path. It's no coincidence that the below expression is a common stock phrase being mentioned in many Suttas:

"These are the feet of trees, these are empty huts. Meditate, bhikkhu, do not be heedless. Do not have cause to regret it later. This is my instruction to you.”

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svākhāto bhagavatā dhammo sandiṭṭhiko akāliko

ehipassiko opanayiko paccattaṃ veditabbo viññūhī

Here dhammo sandiṭṭhiko akāliko means that dhamma is timeless and 'here & Now'.

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  • For example Sanditthika Sutta: Visible Here-&-Now (AN 6.47)
    – ChrisW
    Jul 1, 2022 at 10:04
  • Sandiṭṭhiko means Dhamma is proficient view of the mastery (he finished practiced himself). akāliko means Dhamma gives it's resultant immediately because of that proficient view. Dhamma is focusing on Nibbana as Magga-mind's object. Proficient view is Magga-mind's factor, 8 noble path. Magga-mind's resultant is absorbing. The difference is the proficient noble-view in 4 noble truth, noble view of all real arising&vanishing, noble view of all real craving, noble view of real-vanishing-of-all-craving (Nibbana), and noble view of all real eight-noble-path. (continue)
    – Bonn
    Jul 1, 2022 at 23:57
  • (continue) Real means not just an imagination, but what-depending-on-origin is real arising and vanishing uncountable times per second, not something like "all moment, in this one second we are reading, is wholesome only" because it's impossible, imagination. And what can finish the origin is really done it's job permanently, not something like "if we drunk we will be really happy only but the next day the truth is we still headache stomachache suffering bla bla bla never ending".
    – Bonn
    Jul 2, 2022 at 0:05
  • Yes buddha had explained akaliko by stating you achieve in this life. but that was an explanation or example. the litteral or gramatical meaning of akaliko is timelessness.
    – enRaiser
    Jul 2, 2022 at 6:26
  • akāliko means immediately effective. akāliko does not mean timeless May 9, 2023 at 21:28
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In the sutta quote below, the Buddha taught as follows, referring to himself and other Buddhas as "the Tathagata":

(1) In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be unfactual, untrue, unbeneficial (or: not connected with the goal), unendearing & disagreeable to others, he does not say them.

(2) In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, unbeneficial, unendearing & disagreeable to others, he does not say them.

(3) In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, beneficial, but unendearing & disagreeable to others, he has a sense of the proper time for saying them.

(4) In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be unfactual, untrue, unbeneficial, but endearing & agreeable to others, he does not say them.

(5) In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, unbeneficial, but endearing & agreeable to others, he does not say them.

(6) In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, beneficial, and endearing & agreeable to others, he has a sense of the proper time for saying them. Why is that? Because the Tathagata has sympathy for living beings."

Abhaya Sutta (MN58)

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Someone may think why I don't quote Abhidhamma directly even it is easier and shorter?

It's because I don't know which readers trust in Abhidhamma, so some reader may has not enough five faculties to meditate Jhana and memorize Tipitaka with Abhidhamma for quicker understand. However, they still have a little chance to understand Dhamma and meditate the five faculties by longer reference and taking longer time to study. So, this answer is very long by Sutta instead of Abhidhamma.

However, if someone need it, tell me.

Nibbana is not time because Nibbana is never arise according to MN 144 Channovādasutta...

“So, Reverend Channa, you should pay close attention to this instruction of the Buddha whenever you can: ‘For the dependent there is agitation. For the independent there’s no agitation. When there’s no agitation there is tranquility. When there is tranquility there’s no inclination. When there’s no inclination there’s no coming and going. When there’s no coming and going there’s no passing away and reappearing (time). When there’s no passing away and reappearing there’s no this world or world beyond or between the two. Just this is the end of suffering (Dhamma[Nibbana]).’” And when the venerables Sāriputta and Mahācunda had given Venerable Channa this advice they got up from their seat and left.

People who knew Nibbana has no arising anymore after 7th rebirth at the most according to KN RatanaSutta...

Those who have seen clearly the noble truths

well-taught by the one of deep discernment —

regardless of what [later] might make them heedless —

will come to no eighth state of becoming. 2

This, too, is an exquisite treasure in the Sangha.

By this truth may there be well-being.

And DN22

[c] "And what is the noble truth of the cessation of stress? The remainderless fading & cessation, renunciation, relinquishment, release, & letting go of that very craving [from arising and vanishing(time) kaya vedana citta dhamma, suffering -- (you need to remember entire sutta to understand this parenthesis)].

[You need to be at least the Jhana mastery to understand this quote...] And nibbana is the main origin of AnantarikaSamadhi [Phala], the resultant Phala-absorbing-concentration of the origin Magga-absorbing-concentration, according to KN RatanaSutta...

[Nibbana] The exquisite Deathless — ending, dispassion —

discovered by the Sakyan Sage in concentration [the Buddha's Magga]:

There is nothing to equal that Dhamma.

This, too, is an exquisite treasure in the Dhamma.

By this truth may there be well-being.

What concentration which the excellent Awakened One extolled as pure

and called the nothing-in-between[the Budhha's Phala]:

No equal to that concentration can be found.

This, too, is an exquisite treasure in the Dhamma.

By this truth may there be well-being.

And SN 22.81 Parileyyaka Sutta [My english is not that good so I'm not sure others' translate are right. It should be translated like this according to the Pali.]

evaṃpi kho bhikkhave jānato evaṃ passato anantarā āsavānaṃ khayo hotīti.

When the practitioner proficiently understand proficiently see [the truth] like that[Magga is finishing craving, not finished], then his finished [craving-]taints is arising [Phala is finished craving, never arise anymore].

And AN SamkhittaSutta, etc.

so imesaṃ pañcannaṃ indriyānaṃ muduttā dandhaṃ anantariyaṃ[Magga] pāpuṇāti āsavānaṃ khayāya[Phala] ayaṃ vuccati bhikkhave dukkhā paṭipadā dandhābhiññā.

Because of his weak five faculties, he difficultly attain the nothing-in-between-to-give[Magga]-the-finished-taints[Phala]. This is called a person who difficult to practice and taking long time to enlighten.

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  • nice answer. very nice. i will finish later..
    – blue_ego
    May 19, 2023 at 3:16
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What am I becoming as the days & nights fly past? A person gone forth should often reflect on this.

Kathaṁbhūtassa me rattindivā vītivattantī’ti pabbajitena abhiṇhaṁ paccavekkhitabbaṁ.

AN 10.48

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the context is important. i don't know the context. somewhere just recently i remember reading something like, 'buddha leans like the tower of Pisa'. i can't find it, but somehow the idea is striking - beautiful I suppose. what it means i don't know, but I can imagine the tower saying something like 'time doesn't matter'. there is something eternal about it. if you've ever seen it, you would understand.

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