2

Are there any Suttas, Vinaya or Abhidhamma explaining sīlabbata-parāmāsa in detail?

Please kindly provide examples if knowing. Thank you

3 Answers 3

2

Clinging to precepts and practices which lead to increase in unskillful mental qualities and decrease in skillful mental qualities is silabbata paramasa.

"When — by following a life of precept & practice (sīlabbata) , a life, a holy life that is followed as of essential worth — one's unskillful mental qualities increase while one's skillful mental qualities decline: that sort of precept & practice, life, holy life that is followed as of essential worth is fruitless. But when — by following a life of precept & practice, a life, a holy life that is followed as of essential worth — one's unskillful mental qualities decline while one's skillful mental qualities increase: that sort of precept & practice, life, holy life that is followed as of essential worth is fruitful."
AN 3.78

Also, purity of virtue is for the sake of purity of mind.

Clinging to the right precepts and practices, beyond the purpose of mental purification, is also silabbata paramasa, based on the raft simile of MN 22.

"In the same way, my friend, purity in terms of virtue (sīlavisuddhi) is simply for the sake of purity in terms of mind (cittavisuddhi). Purity in terms of mind is simply for the sake of purity in terms of view. Purity in terms of view is simply for the sake of purity in terms of the overcoming of perplexity. Purity in terms of the overcoming of perplexity is simply for the sake of purity in terms of knowledge & vision of what is & is not the path. Purity in terms of knowledge & vision of what is & is not the path is simply for the sake of purity in terms of knowledge & vision of the way. Purity in terms of knowledge & vision of the way is simply for the sake of purity in terms of knowledge & vision. Purity in terms of knowledge & vision is simply for the sake of total Unbinding through lack of clinging. And it's for the sake of total Unbinding through lack of clinging that the holy life is lived under the Blessed One."
MN 24

In the same way, monks, I have taught the Dhamma compared to a raft, for the purpose of crossing over, not for the purpose of holding onto. Understanding the Dhamma as taught compared to a raft, you should let go even of Dhammas, to say nothing of non-Dhammas."
MN 22

2
  • 1
    best answer IMO
    – Andriy Volkov
    Feb 14, 2022 at 10:58
  • 1
    this answer is useful. I recall there is sutta where the Buddha rebukes some monks because they returned to the monastery with moral outrage at a certain behaviour of laypeople. Can u remember this sutta? Thanks Feb 17, 2022 at 0:36
0

According to DN 15 MahaniddanaSutta

SilabbataParamasa

"And this is the way to understand how it is that because of defensiveness various evil, unskillful phenomena come into play: the taking up of sticks and knives; conflicts, quarrels, and disputes; accusations, divisive speech, and lies. If there were no defensiveness at all, in any way, of anything anywhere, in the utter absence of defensiveness, from the cessation of defensiveness, would various evil, unskillful phenomena -- the taking up of sticks and knives; conflicts, quarrels, and disputes; accusations, divisive speech, and lies -- come into play?"

"No, lord."

"Thus this is a cause, this is a reason, this is an origination, this is a requisite condition for the coming-into-play of various evil, unskillful phenomena -- the taking up of sticks and knives; conflicts, quarrels, and disputes; accusations, divisive speech, and lies -- i.e., defensiveness.

"’Defensiveness is dependent on stinginess.’ Thus it has been said. And this is the way to understand how defensiveness is dependent on stinginess. If there were no stinginess at all, in any way, of anything anywhere, in the utter absence of stinginess, from the cessation of stinginess, would defensiveness be discerned?"

"No, lord."

"Thus this is a cause, this is a reason, this is an origination, this is a requisite condition for defensiveness, i.e., stinginess.

(Similarly back through the chain of conditions: stinginess, attachment, possessiveness, desire and passion, ascertainment, acquisition, and seeking.)

SakkayaDitthi

"’Seeking is dependent on craving.’ Thus it has been said. And this is the way to understand how seeing is dependent on craving. If there were no craving at all, in any way, of anything anywhere -- i.e., craving for sensuality, craving for becoming, craving for no becoming -- in the utter absence of craving, from the cessation of craving, would seeking be discerned?"

"No, lord."

"Thus this is a cause, this is a reason, this is an origination, this is a requisite condition for seeking, i.e., craving. Thus, Ānanda, these two phenomena [the chain of conditions leading from craving to birth, aging, and death, and the chain of conditions leading from craving to quarrels, etc.], as a duality, flow back into one place at feeling.

And the practitioner can see something like that through the entire tipitaka after understanding what I wrote here.

6
  • DN 15 mentions "sīlabbatupādānaṁ" but does it define what it means? The bit you quoted is (according to Ven. Sujato's translation) about "safeguarding" (caused by "stinginess", caused by "ownership", caused by "attachment", caused by "desire and lust", caused by "assessing", caused by "seeking", caused by "craving", etc.). Is that related to "SilabbataParamasa": which Ven Sujato translates as "grasping at precepts and observances"?
    – ChrisW
    Feb 13, 2022 at 10:24
  • Sila means usually do. If one do usually same Tanha, it is called Upadana (=Paramasa, hold again and again, addict). It is called SilabbataParamasa when those repeating behaviors are stronger and stronger enough to act verbally or physically, then break Sila. SakkayaDitthi is Tanha, and 3 Upadana. SilabbataParamasa is verbally or physically SakkayaDitthi. That's why DN1 end with the dependent origination (stat with verbal argument of teacher and student, then 62 Ditthi, then Dependent Origination).
    – Bonn
    Feb 13, 2022 at 11:47
  • Thanks for clarifying. That makes sense as an explanation; but it is not what I expected from the translations as "attachment to rites and rituals" and "grasping at precepts"!
    – ChrisW
    Feb 13, 2022 at 13:55
  • @ChrisW It's same. You need to translate pali word by word. "Attachment to rites and rituals" and "grasping at precepts" are just the worst cases. Actually, all of the ordinaries' conversations and actions are rites and rituals because they are attaching every second of their lives, even they are talking Dhamma or meditating, tanha still going on.
    – Bonn
    Feb 13, 2022 at 14:12
  • this answer plus the bolded headings in it appear irrelevant to the question Feb 17, 2022 at 0:39
0

(3) “What is the clinging to mere rules and ritual (sīlabbatupādāna/sīlabbata-parāmāsa-upādāna, one of the five lower fetters, of the ten.)? The holding firmly to the view that through mere rules and ritual one may reach purification: this is called the clinging to mere rules and ritual. [Dhammasaṅgaṇi 1214-17]

Such as dog- or ox-duties, un-instructed meditation, meditating without leaving house, water-rituals, or what ever kind of householding and rules and rituals not within the eightfold path, not based on right view, holding on views, good householder. And what is holding on views?

“What is the clinging to views? 'Alms and offerings are useless; there is no fruit and result for good and bad deeds: all such view and wrong conceptions are called the clinging to views...

He has wrong view, is warped in the way he sees things: 'There is nothing given, nothing offered, nothing sacrificed. There is no fruit or result of good or bad actions. There is no this world, no next world, no mother, no father, no spontaneously reborn beings; no brahmans or contemplatives who, faring rightly & practicing rightly, proclaim this world & the next after having directly known & realized it for themselves.'

And whats the root of holding on views/stand/household, denying right view?

“What now is the sensuous clinging? Whatever with regard to sensuous objects there exists of sensuous lust, sensuous desire, sensuous attachment, sensuous passion, sensuous deludedness, sensuous fetters: this is called sensuous clinging.

May it be of use for leaving home and not be used to maintain it for ones house. As this holding on is an aspect of bhava-tanha, a strong parāmāsa, going after housegstand or wishing to destroy it.

Refined at least...

"Ananda, every precept & practice, every life, every holy life that is followed as of essential worth: is every one of them fruitful?" -> Silabbata Sutta: Precept & Practice

3
  • i found the first quote in the answer relevant but the remainder of the answer is confusing. In fact, my impression is clinging to the quote from the Dhammasaṅgaṇi may lead to the what looks like sīlabbata-parāmāsa in the remainder of the answer. It seems moralizing & evangelizing inappropriately (such as to the wrong audience) may possibly also be sīlabbata-parāmāsa. Feb 17, 2022 at 0:30
  • Maybe Cunda Kammaraputta Sutta helps zugangzureinsicht.org/html/tipitaka/an/an10/… in regard to know, if good householder seeks after that and not as usuals sideways to justify his incapacities, rejecting the boat before going off-shore on lost land. Good householder, of course is part of same kind of audience: those not found faith yet. It's liberal given and he can use it for merits or for gains. Up to him.
    – user23448
    Feb 17, 2022 at 4:45
  • Reaching the Noble Domain stinginess, and defence toward the right path, by having left home, decays, no more merely rites and rituals with no effect toward liberation.
    – user23448
    Feb 17, 2022 at 4:52

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .