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Chinese often worship Ji Gong and I m quite confuse here. Buddhism practices should be placed at 1st instead of just worshiping or believing in fortune telling. Some may have possession of Ji Gong and provide fortune telling/healing service which I believe is forbidden in Buddhism.

Source of Ji Gong

Unlike traditional Buddhist monks, Daoji did not like following traditional monastic codes

Not long after that, Buddhism began to recognise Daoji's compassionate efforts and he is involved in many classic kōans.

Where can I find more information on how Buddhism recognizes/accepts Ji Gong ?  It's giving me the impression Buddhism accepts Ji Gong's teaching? Its giving me impression recognised, drink and teach too in Buddhism ?

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I've yet to find any koan or other forms of Buddhist texts explicitly mentioning Ji Gong, so it's difficult to say whether he was 'accepted' by some schools or not. But we can look at other factors.

Are there precedents? Yes. There are many well-known (and greatly revered) bizarre monks in the history of Buddhism. A notable example is Drukpa Kunley, who allegedly used his penis to subdue evil and had had sex with thousands of women. More on par with Ji Gong would be Hanshan (寒山) and Shide (拾得), who are often depicted with distinctive expressions, heads full of hair and wearing ragged clothing. This duo are pretty popular in Zen, and, similar to Ji Gong, are believed to be the incarnations of Manjusri (文殊) and Samantabhadra (普賢), despite behaving like lunatics. One depiction of Hanshan & Shide from the Muromachi period

Should monks behave like so? Hard to answer. Monks keep the precepts to cultivate compassion and develop the mind. But one can argue that, since an enlightened being is unattached, unbound and know what they are doing, they need not to follow the precepts as long as their actions help others grow spiritually and reduce their suffering. Although there are differences between the craziness of an enlightened being and that of someone with mental illnesses (see Andrei's answer on crazy wisdom), there are times where the distinction can be blurry.

Note that this line of thinking only applies in one direction. It does not justify doing scummy things and then later claiming that you've done so because you're enlightened.

To sum it up, these monks - Ji Gong included - presumably knew what they were doing. The benefits of the monastic rules are not negated by their acts. If you're a beginner, it's still best to keep all the precepts.


There are already many answers concerning fortune telling:

AFAIK, those who provide and engage in fortune telling in Buddhist temples in China are not monastics, so the Brahmajala Sutra won't apply to them (a.k.a not wrong livelihood). My take is that if you aren't obsessively into fortune telling, the practice is harmless.

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  • me just visiting temple to temple recently while traveling and trying to understand the culture and Buddhism better :) When something interested found out then will post ques here to clarify the doubts. Perhaps some world Buddhism organization could standardize and clear this up but we dont seem having one yet or perhaps waiting for Maitreya. I do visit Church to Church too. dailyzen.com/journal/great-doubt Nov 5 '21 at 8:59
  • i can guaranteed all these crazy things would be banned by World Buddhism Organization if we have one like Ivermectin usages for Covid 19 cure. Nov 5 '21 at 9:19
  • well, I dont think Ji Gong anything to relate to Drukpa Kunley even both regards as mad monk. Ji Gong is a good hearted monk but just commit ethical rules in monestary but not a crime. The other can consider is a rape or a crime. As a summary, why would u learn from a drunk or crime teacher ? It's just common sense in regards of Buddhism. I just wanna study the culture and doent mean I accept the teaching. But some temple offer Ji Gong consultation service indeed with good deed n harmony teacher so I didnt bother much. U may continue this in the Buddhism chat box ya Nov 5 '21 at 11:53

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