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I wonder about the practicalities of being a foreign monk in Asia, especially Theravada-majority countries.

In particular;

About the Visa arrangements, can this at all be handled without much stress by one who doesn't use money?

What about the rule of not driving a car or using vehicles, is this a rule that can be kept by one in such a predicament?

Anything relevant is of interest.

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    Asia is a very big continent with 48 countries. You may want to narrow the question down to one country or a few countries.
    – ruben2020
    Sep 13 at 17:25
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  • Well it's not like one can ordain as Theravadin in China or Kazakhstan etc. South East i guess. I don't have a particular country in mind at this point.
    – user8527
    Sep 13 at 18:07
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    Other topics with some mention of visas: Myanmar -- Nepal -- Sri Lanka
    – ChrisW
    Sep 13 at 18:54
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Good householder,

one who went forth under the Gem is everywhere outside the Buddhaparisa a foreigner. One who went forth does not relay on 'rights' or demands, but has just the Gems as refuge and receives what is given without strings toward world. One who has gone forth abstains from using vehicles, dwells in the Vihara of metta for all. One who has gone forth does not desire to (be)come and arrive anywhere in this world, does not seek protection where non can be found. Less are those ready and in firm faith of going forth, for deals for another home usually seems more secure to them.

Nothing faster as one barefooted on the right track.

Does one seeks another home or go for leaving it behind?

It would be everywhere difficult living the Brahmacaria to it's end if staying in the world if not in the Brahmadwellings or beyond any borderland.

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  • It is difficult everywhere but i should choose what is least difficult right? I am not about to make things harder for myself by going to foreign lands if i can train better here as a layman or ordaining elsewhere. Laymen can be Arahnts you know, 7 days, it's not like monks have a monopoly on going forth.
    – user8527
    Sep 14 at 8:42
  • Your answer isn't really making clear what is obscure
    – user8527
    Sep 14 at 8:44
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Foreign Monks in Sri Lanka

There are a few foreign monks in Sri Lanka.

There are usually not many monks that speak English in the temples.

Visa rules have recently changed allowing visa beyond three months:

Residence Visa for clergy is Free.

Are you an ordained Monk? If so your home temple should be able to arrange your stay in Sri Lanka.

Are you currently a novice? The folks at the Canadian vihara I belong to should be willing to advise you on your journey: https://www.bvs.org/ There are many Sri Lankan members.

I have never seen a monk here needing to pay for local transportation. Dana is provided in the temple by the community. I have not seen monks begging for food door to door as in Cambodia.

It would be best to have everything arranged before you depart.

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Good householder,

I wonder about the practicalities of being a foreign monk in Asia, especially Theravada-majority countries.

It's more difficult to become a foreigner, than to stay at home in one's homeland. One could easily just stay at home.

About the Visa arrangements, can this at all be handled without much stress by one who doesn't use money?

How could one handle something requiring money, if not accepting, using or telling others to use and abstains from trade with householders?

In other words, if you need to get something done that requires money, then you need to deal with money, whether directly or indirectly.

What about the rule of not driving a car or using vehicles, is this a rule that can be kept by one in such a predicament?

It would be not wrong if sick and not able to walk to accept a male ride (cyclo, bike, cart, man-powered). It's also not wrong to give a fellow a hand cart ride, if given to use one and desire to 'drive'.

Anything relevant is of interest.

DN 2: Samaññaphala Sutta — The Fruits of the Contemplative Life

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