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Requesting sutta references mentioning "sacrifice" along with pali words commonly (and uncommonly) translated as "sacrifice" along with thoughts and commentary please

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  • Found this: There are some ascetics and brahmins who have this doctrine and view: ‘Purity comes from sacrifice.’ But it’s not easy to find a sacrifice that I haven’t previously offered in all this long time, when I was an anointed aristocratic king or a well-to-do brahmin. via suttacentral.net/mn12/en/…
    – vimutti
    Nov 20 at 23:45
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The Buddha discouraged animal sacrifice, human sacrifice, and other extra extravagant ritualistic sacrifices (soma juice drinking etc.), of which I quoted only part of the sutta of AN 4.39 below.

The Buddha however praised non-violent sacrifices, which I think refers to giving gifts (or contributing necessities) to family members.

Based on the dictionary entry given below for "yañña" (sacrifice), it seems like this term is used both for animal sacrifices and charity.

A similar teaching is given in SN 3.9.

“Does Master Gotama praise sacrifice (yañña)?”

“Brahmin, I don’t praise all sacrifices. Nor do I criticize all sacrifices. Take the kind of sacrifice where cattle, goats and sheep, chickens and pigs, and various kinds of creatures are slaughtered. I criticize that kind of violent sacrifice. Why is that? Because neither perfected ones nor those who are on the path to perfection will attend such a violent sacrifice.

But take the kind of sacrifice where cattle, goats and sheep, chickens and pigs, and various kinds of creatures are not slaughtered. I praise that kind of non-violent sacrifice; for example, a regular gift as an ongoing family sacrifice. Why is that? Because perfected ones and those who are on the path to perfection will attend such a non-violent sacrifice.
AN 4.39

From the PTS Pali-English dictionary entry on "yañña":

Yañña Yañña [Vedic yajña, fr. yaj: see yajati. The metric reading in the Veda is sometimes yajana, which we are inclined to look upon as not being the source of the P. yajana] 1. a brahmanic sacrifice. — 2. almsgiving, charity, a gift to the Sangha or a bhikkhu. The brahmanic ritual of Vedic times has been given a changed and deeper meaning. Buddhism has discarded the outward and cruel form and has widened its sphere by changing its participant, its object as well as the means and ways of "offering," so that the yañña now consists entirely in a worthy application of a worthy gift to a worthy applicant.

The Buddha also taught to not sacrifice one's own welfare for others in Dhp 166. The commentary for this verse can be found here. Please also read this answer.

Let one not neglect one's own welfare for the sake of another, however great. Clearly understanding one's own welfare, let one be intent upon the good.
Dhp 166

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    The link to the Dhp-verses on The Self is really good, thanks.
    – user21421
    Aug 2 at 13:00
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    The phrase "for example, a regular gift as an ongoing family sacrifice" is intriguing. What does it refer to?
    – Juckix
    Aug 13 at 8:55
  • Yes, what actually happened at a non-violent "ongoing family sacrifice" involving animals? Were they given to someone?
    – vimutti
    Aug 17 at 21:00
  • Also, are there other examples of non-violent sacrifices other than SN 3.9 and AN 4.39?
    – vimutti
    Aug 17 at 21:01

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