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I read the following on the internet:

In an uncultivated individual the emotions rule the self. This is the result of lack of understanding of Anatta and somehow the individual is putting conscious effort into the stagnation of their naturally dynamic emotions.

Emotions are naturally dynamic and a result of environmental influence, which is also dynamic - so in that sense Anatta is applicable.

What are "dynamic emotions" in Buddhism?

Does anatta or its realisation stop the stagnation of naturally dynamic emotions?

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What are "dynamic emotions" in Buddhism?

"Dynamic emotions" is somewhat sloppy language. It just means that samsaric phenomena, in this case emotions, are in a constant flux. They are ever-changing and arise and cease incessantly and without any control.

Does anatta or its realisation stop the stagnation of naturally dynamic emotions?

Sorry, I didn't understand this question. You write "stop the stagnation" - do you mean if the natural process of exhaustion of causes and conditions can be stopped by realizing Anatta?

There are 3 gateways/doors to liberation - truly realizing and understanding Anatta is one of them. So in that sense, the process of becoming can be stopped by winning Nibbana, thereby issuing liberation from the rounds of suffering.

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  • the above appears to be saying the realization of anatta does not stop samsara, which seems contrary to what the suttas teach, such as in SN 22.99 – Dhammadhatu Jan 28 at 0:04
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Think of the mind as a body of water, like a pond, or river, or lake. It has a natural flow, and responds to the environment around it with currents and waves and tides. We call these liquid movements of the mind by different names depending on how we experience them — thoughts, moods, emotions, passions, etc. — and when we are meditating we seek to let them all come to stillness. But it's useful to know there is no separation here. These 'objects' (thoughts, emotions, etc) are epiphenomena: the mind's way of explaining its own movements when it cannot see itself fully.

Before we cultivate the concept of anatta we have an egoic self, and the nature of an egoic self is that it tries to generate, organize, and marshal these flows to its own purposes. If the egoic self feels a slight, it may not be enough that a wave of anger rises and falls. That wave may have to be corralled, perpetuated, and put to use to achieve some vengeance. If the egoic self feels the stirrings of love, it may not be enough to let that current flow as it will. The egoic mind may channel and focus that current into romantic pursuit, ardor, even possessiveness and jealousy.

All of this can lead to the stagnation of emotion: the egoic mind forcing the movements of the mind into ruts or patterns that may or may not be useful, functional, or healthy. We all know someone who is constantly angry and constantly looking for new reasons to be angry, because the egoic mind has established that pattern. They have an attachment to anger, and that attachment ties up the natural flows of the mind in that one emotion. When one developed an understanding of anatta, those attachments start to break away (because there is no self to anchor them to) and the energy tied up in them returns to its more natural state.

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