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...and why?

Is the a case where one would neither need nor want?

What's (or would be) a "trade" purified on one or both sides and it's quality, effect, if given into? That of one pulling one out, not in.

[Note that this isn't given for stacks, exchange, or other world-binding earning but for a pull out of the wheel.]

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A monk does not have to earn a living, but can get his food from alms.

However, what about a layperson? In the context of a layperson, the Buddha condemns laziness and making excuses for not working.

From Sigalovada Sutta:

And what six ways of squandering wealth are to be avoided? Young man, heedlessness caused by intoxication, roaming the streets at inappropriate times, habitual partying, compulsive gambling, bad companionship, and laziness are the six ways of squandering wealth.

Also from the same sutta:

"These are the six dangers inherent in laziness: saying, 'It's too cold,' one does not work; saying, 'It's too hot,' one does not work; saying, 'It's too late,' one does not work; saying, 'It's too early,' one does not work; saying, 'I'm too hungry,' one does not work; saying, 'I'm too full,' one does not work. With an abundance of excuses for not working, new wealth does not accrue and existing wealth goes to waste."

From Parabhava Sutta:

The man who is fond of sleep and company, inactive and lazy, and manifesting anger —this is the cause of his downfall.

In the sutta below, the Buddha praises the five benefits obtained from "wealth earned through his efforts & enterprise, amassed through the strength of his arm, and piled up through the sweat of his brow, righteous wealth righteously gained".

From Adiya Sutta:

"There is the case where the disciple of the noble ones — using the wealth earned through his efforts & enterprise, amassed through the strength of his arm, and piled up through the sweat of his brow, righteous wealth righteously gained — provides himself with pleasure & satisfaction, and maintains that pleasure rightly. He provides his mother & father with pleasure & satisfaction, and maintains that pleasure rightly. He provides his children, his wife, his slaves, servants, & assistants with pleasure & satisfaction, and maintains that pleasure rightly. This is the first benefit that can be obtained from wealth.

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  • "begging" for alms is for an ordinary person also just a livelihood. Good householder hasn't got the essence of the question, aside of the fact that one livelihood isn't something gained by birth but a matter of coice, unless an animal... Again the question was about want and need and what's even beyound. Nov 11 '20 at 3:17
  • ...aside... does householder find a hand full of people who "amassed through the strength of his arm, and piled up through the sweat of his brow, righteous wealth righteously gained" around him... Nov 11 '20 at 3:20
  • It's "fantastic" how improper attention rules the crowd and rulers here... Nov 11 '20 at 3:25
  • @SamanaJohann From the suttas quoted (and also others like Dhammapada 155-156), it sounds like lay persons begging for alms instead of earning their livelihood, can be considered laziness. Can you find any sutta stating that lay persons can beg for alms, as part of their Right Livelihood (for lay persons)?
    – ruben2020
    Nov 11 '20 at 5:37
  • Could good householder focus on the question? (Sure, taking of what is given, without trade, is highest livelihood, but hard to do. My person had the "luck" while still living in white and observing 10 precepts. Sure, often it wasn't much or things like a month instant noodles, while living on given place.) But again, the question is about "want" certain, "need" to do task, and beyond (just a field for merits. Nov 11 '20 at 9:24
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Everyone needs to earn a livelihood.

The Dhamma is ādi-kalyāṇaṁ majjhe-kalyāṇaṁ pariyosāna-kalyāṇaṁ; beautiful in the beginning, beautiful in the middle, beautiful in the end.

Similar to a beautiful woman who earns livelihood being a beautiful fashion model; the livelihood of a bhikkhu is to be an example of beautiful conduct.

"Go forth, o bhikkhus, for the good of the many, for the happiness of the many, out of compassion for the world, for the benefit, for the good, for the happiness of gods and men. Let not two go by one way. Preach the doctrine that is beautiful in its beginning, beautiful in its middle, and beautiful in its ending. Declare the holy life in its purity, completely both in the spirit and the letter."

Mahavagga, Vinaya Pitaka.

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  • "Everyone needs to earn a livelihood.", who says aside of ditthi? No body needs, yet the Aharahants want, of cause, other then Arahats. Useless and thoughless polemic, like always. For how would a loosy person make his living differently here... Nov 11 '20 at 11:07
  • Noble Eightfold Path includes Right Livelihood as a factor. Nov 11 '20 at 11:08

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