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I wanted to ask how Buddhism explains why we don't remember our past lives? Why bother with the Buddhist path when we will not remember this temporary life in our next? I heard that for example contrary to rebirth in the human realm, beings who are reborn in the Pureland of Amitabha can remember their past life. Why bother practice other methods and not only just focus on reaching Sukhavati? If I won't remember the temporary "me" of this life in the next, why bother practicing at all? Isn't it better to know about my continuity in the next life for progression?

  • You can practice for happiness in this life. Whether you believe in rebirth or not, practicing for happiness in this life is a main concern. Some people attain the ability to recollect their previous births. But this ability comes after decades of consistent, disciplined practice. – Sāvaka Kovida Aug 30 at 11:51
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Many new to Buddhism are stuck into these matters and created a feeling of discomfort, including myself.

But when I longer study Buddhism, it leads me to study something easier to understand like Karma in current life instead of past life. I.e. how to utilize the SWOT analysis soft skill?

If you are talking about past life, likely it will lead to past life Karma thinking which is very difficult to digest; even Einstein was not able to decode it completely.

So, why do you bother too much on it? Secondly, thinking too much about the past that you are unable to change or back to the future, that is impossible, just simply making you suffer psychologically and it is a negative thought.

Most of us spend a lot of time inside our own mind — worrying about the future, replaying events in the past, and generally focusing on the parts of life that leave us dissatisfied

(source)

Here is a so called proven story about incarnation by Mahatma Gandhi that is hardly believed to be false.

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Do you remember what you had for lunch yesterday? We remember only if we are interested in that thing or it is extremely important for us. We continually become because we are not happy with the past or present. The time of the arrow goes only forward.

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I wanted to ask how Buddhism explains why we don't remember our past lives?

Sabbe Dhamma Anatta. Memory is not me, mine or myself. If so, how do you expect to remember past lives?

Why bother with the Buddhist path when we will not remember this temporary life in our next?

We do not wish to return. No more rebirths. We wish that this is the last birth of me. Why do we wish so? Because birth leads to suffering. How do we ensure we do not return? By following the noble 8 fold path (or the Buddhist path).

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Remember, if life isn't working out for you this time round, you must have been really bad in the last life.

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The human brain takes around 7 years to completely mature. Hence why the youngest age where people become Arahats is at age 7, with the exception of a few. It takes 9 months for a human baby to be fully formed, so memories from the past lives are forgotten in this time. Devas (Divine Beings) and Prethas (Hungry Ghosts) and other beings that are born spontaneously (Opapathika) retain their memories, you can read the suttas and the Pretha Stories (Pretha Katha Wasthu) for more info.

But our mind is very powerful, through Samatha meditation one can slowly bring the mind to a state where he/she can recall these forgotten memories.

If we really did retain all memories from our previous births, everyone would be following the Middle-Path striving towards enlightenment as we would know the suffering we had to experience in our previous births and the futility of feeding the five senses.

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