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I know that lord Buddha refrain from finding the all the laws of nature from science, everything in universe.(Understanding the whole truth of the universe). I like to know the reason for this.

Is it because our knowledge about the universe is so weak that we don't see anything, nor that the universe is so big that it is endless, (please correct me if i am wrong about this)? I know that lord Buddha mentioned the endless expansion and collapse of the universe. This phrase follows with Gibbs free energy theory, where everything goes to disorder. To make things into order it causes energy.

Like keeping the mind in one place is very hard. If I find nibbana in the coming up life, maybe I will realize that it is not meaningful. Currently I like learning new things in science, like I love reading books of prof. Hawkings teachings... Will all this knowledge be worthless if I find nibbana someday?

Also I am confused of the fact that Lord Mugalan did try to find the whole truth of the universe by meditation. Is it true that he got caught in a infinite loop and Lord Buddha saved him?

  • May I know where you got this idea that the "Buddha said that finding the all the laws of nature from science is not meaningful?" – Kumāra Bhikkhu Jun 23 at 3:38
  • It's better that you ask your questions separately. I think you have at least 3 up there. – Kumāra Bhikkhu Jun 23 at 3:39
  • OyaMist's answer has the answer for that there has to be a correction I think he did not say that Lord Buddha just refuses to answer those questions like OyaMist says – Avon Pubudu Jayaweera Jun 23 at 7:12
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I like to know the reason for this.

Conjecture about [the origin, etc., of] the world is an unconjecturable that is not to be 
conjectured about, that would bring madness & vexation to anyone who conjectured about it.

https://suttacentral.net/an4.77/en/thanissaro

In plain english, the reason for this is that these types of questions are not required for the path towards nirvana at best, or straight up misleading at worst.

Will all this knowledge be worthless if I find nibbana someday?

I wouldn't put down a physicists knowledge of the world, but it has little or nothing to do with buddhas dharma.

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The value of knowledge about a system has diminishing returns. There is an infinite amount of relatively useless information and knowledge is thus inexhaustible since transmigation is beginningless.

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The wanderer Vaccagottha once asked Venerable Moggallāna:

SN44.7:2.1: “Master Moggallāna, is this right: ‘the world is eternal’?”

To this and many other questions, Moggallāna simply answers:

SN44.7:2.2: “Vaccha, this has not been declared by the Buddha.”

Frustrated, Vaccagottha exclaims:

SN44.7:3.3: And what’s the cause, what’s the reason why the ascetic Gotama doesn’t answer these questions when asked?”

In this case Moggallana answers by explaining that the Buddha teaches the ending of craving:

SN44.7:4.1: “Vaccha, the wanderers who follow other paths regard the eye like this: ‘This is mine, I am this, this is my self.’ They regard the ear … nose … tongue … body … mind like this: ‘This is mine, I am this, this is my self.’

SN44.7:4.7: The Realized One, the perfected one, the fully awakened Buddha regards the eye like this: ‘This is not mine, I am not this, this is not my self.’ He regards the ear … nose … tongue … body … mind like this: ‘This is not mine, I am not this, this is not my self.’ That’s why he doesn’t answer these questions when asked.”

Unsatisfied with Venerable Moggallāna, Vaccagottha seeks out the Buddha and asks the same questions...

...and the Buddha gives exactly the same answers.

The Four Noble Truths concern themselves with the ending of suffering. They are all we need.

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No one has enough life to learn the whole world because the whole world is not just now. The whole world includes past, future, or present; internal or external; blatant or subtle; common or sublime; far or near.

Although, this knowledge is important for the practitioner to understand 3 characteristics, the practitioner needs to avoid learning too much over their life time because the point is Nibbana, not only worldly knowing.

Time never stop and it's not easy to meet the Buddhism, so it's not ok if you die before enlightened.

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He only wanted the end of suffering. He learned what he needed, and then some, but tought strictly only that which was needed. Otherwise, distractions occur, which are antithetical. Creation stories, based in science or otherwise, generally don't help end suffering. ;)

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