1

What happens when individuality totally disappears by recognizing the five skhandas as not "me" or "mine"?

Which platform or ground remains after one has fully realized that the five skhandas are impermanent?

  • I did some editing to your grammar. Please comment in case your original question was changed too much. – Erik Jun 16 at 11:10
  • I don't understand this question. – MAGA2020 Jul 16 at 20:39
0

MN121 is a wonderful discourse on emptiness. At the end, the five skandhas are gone:

MN121:12.1: They understand: ‘Here there is no stress due to the defilements of sensuality, desire to be reborn, or ignorance.

However, something remains:

MN121:12.3: There is only this modicum of stress, namely that associated with the six sense fields dependent on this body and conditioned by life.’

In particular, the Buddha instructs Ananda:

MN121:12.6: And so they regard it as empty of what is not there, but as to what remains they understand that it is present.

Perhaps the most remarkable aspect of this instruction is its universal applicability. It is true riding on a crowded train. It is true in deep meditation. Conventionally we ignore the emptiness and grasp at what remains. With practice we see that emptiness is always there. And we are simply aware of what remains, attending without grasping.

| improve this answer | |
  • That's again the paradox of what remain after "is" or "isn't". Thats again dilemmas. I feel nobody knows what it is. It's not emptiness, not fullness, not self, not name and form, not 5 subtle elements, not 6 six senses and bases, not volition, not consciousness, not feeling. So, who knows, what it is? Then this theory coincides with Brahman, as they say, it's unknowable. They call it as unattached awareness in its natural state. Is it true or false? Buddha also says, "who is unattached and unbound within is Brahmana!". Please share your views here, Sirs. – Sandeep Telang Jun 16 at 13:44
  • I actually recommend against sharing personal views except where they directly illustrate the Dhamma as spoken by the Buddha. To do so runs the risk of falling into the DN1 net of views. It also violates the premise of StackExchange which does not support opinions. Personally, what I have posted is actually exactly what I limit my thinking to in order to avoid the danger of overthinking. – OyaMist Jun 16 at 14:00
0

What happens when individuality totally disappears by recognizing the five skhandas as not "me" or "mine"?

While "recognizing" is the important first step, by itself it won't help making individuality (sense of "I", "mine", "myself") totally disappears. So what needs to happen after one recognizes? one need to "live" it thru a gradual cultivation process taught by the Buddha in the Suttas. And how does one know one has lived it? See a related post here

| improve this answer | |
0

Although the sutta below talks about impermanence, it is the same for not-self too.

When one fully and experientially understands and realizes that the five aggregates are impermanent and not-self, he or she becomes a stream enterer.

So, there are still 3 more stages of enlightenment to go, and 7 more fetters to overcome.

From SN 25.10:

"Monks, form is inconstant, changeable, alterable. Feeling... Perception... Fabrications... Consciousness is inconstant, changeable, alterable.

"One who has conviction & belief that these phenomena are this way is called a faith-follower: one who has entered the orderliness of rightness, entered the plane of people of integrity, transcended the plane of the run-of-the-mill. He is incapable of doing any deed by which he might be reborn in hell, in the animal womb, or in the realm of hungry shades. He is incapable of passing away until he has realized the fruit of stream-entry.

"One who, after pondering with a modicum of discernment, has accepted that these phenomena are this way is called a Dhamma-follower: one who has entered the orderliness of rightness, entered the plane of people of integrity, transcended the plane of the run-of-the-mill. He is incapable of doing any deed by which he might be reborn in hell, in the animal womb, or in the realm of hungry shades. He is incapable of passing away until he has realized the fruit of stream-entry.

"One who knows and sees that these phenomena are this way is called a stream-enterer, steadfast, never again destined for states of woe, headed for self-awakening."

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.