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There are two sentences found in Tripitaka. Do they mean, "the Divine one come to teach on earth"?

Please forgive me, but it very close to Jesus's savings. As Jesus says, "I'm son of Lord, come for you, through his wish, to guide you to my Father"!

These translations of mine is like this. I am native to language close to pali?

  1. tathāgato loke uppajjati arahaṃ sammāsambuddho vijjācaraṇasampanno sugato lokavidū anuttaro purisadammasārathī satthā devamanussānaṃ buddho bhagavā.

    AN 4.160

    My translation: The Highly teacher appears on this world, the prefect holy, the one with Mighty Lord, perfect in wisdom and pure conduct,leading men to safe land, the charioteer of men and god to saddhamma from time immemorial, the Buddha, the Lord of cessation!

  2. Ye dhammā hetuppabhavā,
    Tesaṃ hetuṃ tathāgato āha;

    Mahākhandhaka

    My translation: The causes which exist for suffering (birth, decay,old age, death,unwanted thing, separation of dear ones), to eliminate it, He have come!

Please forgive me Masters here. But that question haunts me everyday! Also my intention isn't to oppose to Buddhist teachings as I think it's a best religion exist on earth ever! Pardon me!

  • I think the first quote is taken from sutta AN 4.160 -- do you know where the second quote is from? – ChrisW Jun 2 at 9:12
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    Mahakhandaka-Sāriputta-Moggallānapabbajjākathā 41. The Story of the Going-Forth of Sāriputta and Moggallāna – Sandeep Telang Jun 2 at 9:21
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Ven. Sujato translates into English that first sentence, as follows, here:

Katamo ca, bhikkhave, sugato? Idha, bhikkhave, tathāgato loke uppajjati arahaṃ sammāsambuddho vijjācaraṇasampanno sugato lokavidū anuttaro purisadammasārathi satthā devamanussānaṃ buddho bhagavā. This is a Holy One.

And who is a Holy One? It’s when a Realized One arises in the world, perfected, a fully awakened Buddha, accomplished in knowledge and conduct, holy, knower of the world, supreme guide for those who wish to train, teacher of gods and humans, awakened, blessed. This is a Holy One.

There's no mention of being "mighty" or "lord of cessation" (as in your translation).

The word you translate as "highly teacher" might be tathāgato and the answers to this topic -- Why does the Buddha call himself the Tathāgata? -- might help to answer your question.


Similarly I.B. Horner and Bhikkhu Brahmali translate the second sentence into English as follows, here:

Ye dhammā hetuppabhavā,
Tesaṃ hetuṃ tathāgato āha;

Those things which proceed from a cause,
of these the Truth-finder has told the cause

Tesañca yo nirodho,
Evaṃvādī mahāsamaṇo”ti.

And that which is their stopping—
the great recluse has such a doctrine.

Again, the word "tathagata" (this time translated as "truth-finder").

Perhaps it isn't that he "came" as in your translation, but that he "said" or "told" (Pali "āha") -- unless your translation was referring to Āgata.

And not that he eliminated suffering (as the Christians might say that Jesus eliminated original sin), but that he explained dependent origination and cessation (the noble truths).

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  • 'Bhagava' is term derived from 'Bhagga or भग्ग'. Remember when Buddha says, 'सब्बे ते तासुका भग्गा',-Dhp 153-4. भग्गा means cessation or demolishment. Buddha bhagava is term one who demolished or cease the cause altogether. So, ultimately it mean Lord of cessation. The term nearly coincides like this, 'The one who got ceased and the one who act to cease it, verily one!' It's almost parallel to verse ,Yam kinki samudayadhamma sabbam...(that one which originate, the same one destroys). It's very close to Brahman, who creates and destroys. That's why I have doubt. Hope you don't label me as such. – Sandeep Telang Jun 3 at 12:21
  • It's like two side of the same coin. This side is origination and the other one is cessation! Only those who can see it clearly, not with the eyes, but with eyes of wisdom can know it better. Those people are rare indeed! – Sandeep Telang Jun 3 at 12:26
  • Apparently there are two words which are both spelled bhagga -- see here -- one means "broken" and is the past participle of bhañj Sanskrit bhagna (presumably a verb meaning "to break") -- and the other is a noun, whose meaning Fortune, luck, welfare, happiness. The word Bhagavant is understood to be derived from the latter -- see e.g. here, "Fortunate One" etc. – ChrisW Jun 3 at 14:42
  • Forgive me. I may have stuck to wrong view. I am closing the question here. Thanks for your kind words. May you become happy! Lastly I will quote Buddha here, that we both may agree. "I call him Brahman, who has enchewed all desires, came out clean to farther shore, cut asunder the bond of birth and death, bearing last life, harms not one, knows his previous dwellings, knows the destination of bad and good state, same in pleasure and pain, warded off sin and virtues both, teaches the others, not remain with either with householders or that of ascetics. Yes, I call him Brahman!" – Sandeep Telang Jun 3 at 16:16
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"Divine" has its roots in the gods, the "devas". However, the Buddha declares this about gods:

AN8.29:1.4: Firstly, a Realized One has arisen in the world—perfected, a fully awakened Buddha, accomplished in knowledge and conduct, holy, knower of the world, supreme guide for those who wish to train, teacher of gods and humans, awakened, blessed. He teaches the Dhamma leading to peace, extinguishment, awakening, as proclaimed by the Holy One.

Indeed, being reborn as a divine god is not so fortunate:

AN8.29:4.2: But a person has been reborn in one of the long-lived orders of gods. This is the fourth lost opportunity.

Because of this, we must be careful in choosing adjectives used for gods and for the Buddha. A human life is the best opportunity to study the Dhamma fully.

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My translation: The Highly teacher appears on this world, the prefect holy, the one with Mighty Lord, perfect in wisdom and pure conduct,leading men to safe land, the charioteer of men and god to saddhamma from time immemorial, the Buddha, the Lord of cessation!

This translation is wrong, which is why you have some misconceptions like,

"the Divine one come to teach on earth"?

"I'm son of Lord, come for you, through his wish, to guide you to my Father"!

Correct idea of this part is,

tathāgato loke uppajjati arahaṃ sammāsambuddho vijjācaraṇasampanno sugato lokavidū anuttaro purisadammasārathī satthā devamanussānaṃ buddho bhagavā.

Humans are suffering, because of birth and only The Lord buddha saw the right path to end of suffering, and with heart-full compassion to others who suffer not only the Humans all beings in worlds, Lord Buddha teaches the way to end of suffering.

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  • तथागत। तथ+आगत (the who come or took birth) and तथ+ गत (the one who gone or ceases) verily the one! – Sandeep Telang Jun 4 at 16:52

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