2

I wonder if the difference has something to do with the permanent destruction (through vipassana bhavana) vs. the temporary destruction (through samatha bhavana) of the kilesas?

2

I wonder if the difference has something to do with the permanent destruction (through vipassana bhavana) vs. the temporary destruction (through samatha bhavana) of the kilesas?

Having only performed a very brief search of the suttas, I follow my intuition and disagree with the question above.

It appears the terms 'cetovimuttiṃ' & 'paññāvimutti' are both used as constituents of the same attainment; therefore 'cetovimuttiṃ' does not appear to refer to 'samatha' or 'samadhi'.

A search for 'paññāvimutti' obtains 171 results. Of these, many of the results contain the words "cetovimuttiṃ paññāvimutti" together, particularly in the following phrase:

āsavānaṃ khayā anāsavaṃ cetovimuttiṃ paññāvimuttiṃ diṭṭheva dhamme sayaṃ abhiññā sacchikatvā

realize the undefiled freedom of heart and freedom by wisdom in this very life

About 'paññāvimutti', SN 22.58 says:

A bhikkhu liberated by wisdom, liberated by nonclinging through revulsion [towards the five agggregates]... through... fading away and cessation, is called one liberated by wisdom.

About 'cetovimuttiṃ', MN 29 says:

Yā ca kho ayaṃ, bhikkhave, akuppā cetovimutti — etadatthamidaṃ, bhikkhave, brahmacariyaṃ, etaṃ sāraṃ etaṃ pariyosānan

the goal, heartwood and final end of the spiritual life is the unshakable freedom of heart.

Now the terms 'cetovimuttiṃ' & 'paññāvimutti' are a type of word compound where the translation is uncertain. Thus, translators such as Ireland & Thanissaro have translated 'cetovimuttiṃ' & 'paññāvimutti' literally as "mind-release" & "wisdom-release". Where as translators such as Bhikkhus Bodhi & Sujato have translated the terms interpretatively as "liberation of mind" and "liberation by wisdom".

Given the descriptions found in SN 22.58 and MN 29 quoted above, I personally would agree with the translations of Bhikkhus Bodhi & Sujato.

In other words, 'paññāvimutti' sounds like a 'means/method' and 'cetovimuttiṃ' sounds like a 'goal/end'. The meditator uses 'paññāvimutti' to achieve 'cetovimuttiṃ'.

4
3

I wonder if the difference has something to do with the permanent destruction (through vipassana bhavana) vs. the temporary destruction (through samatha bhavana) of the kilesas?

Per the Pali dictionary, CetoVimutti and PannaVimutti carry different meanings depending on context (restricted sense versus highest sense). In the highest sense, both are on the same level for they both signify the fruition of Arahantship. They're just different in regards to the specific pathway as a result of the practitioner's dominant faculty on either concentration or insight.

0

Having thus found a firm footing on the first Jhana, he gained the second absorption, which he called "the noble silence" (Samy. 20,1), because all thoughts are silenced in it. Thus he advanced up to the fourth absorption (Samy. 40 2f). As he later told, he had practiced the absorptions in a twofold way, first by cultivating the "Ways of Power" (iddhi-pada; Samy. 51, 31),[4] and then by the "Liberations" (vimokkha; Thag. 1172). On his path towards the final Deliverance by Wisdom (pañña-vimutti), the absorptions (jhana) served as stages to the "Ways of Powers," which led to various kinds of super-normal faculties and also opened up many gate-ways to wisdom. This twofold approach was his strong point when he became an arahant, a Saint. For attaining to the "Liberation of Mind" (ceto-vimutti) the absorption led him to the eight Liberations (vimokkha), culminating in the four formless (immaterial) absorptions (arupajjhana). On his way to become one "Liberated in Both Ways" (that is through both concentration and insight),[5] he used the fourth absorption as basis for both. In doing so, he gained the "Signless Concentration of Mind,"[6] which is free from all that marks (or signifies) conditioned existence and which affords a glimpse of the "Signless Element," Nibbana (Samy. 40,9). But this attainment, too, was not final as yet. For even here he lapsed into a subtle enjoyment of it. Such refined attachment is still a delusive "sign" or "mark" superimposed on a high spiritual attainment of greatest purity. But aided by the Master's instructions, he could free himself from these last fetters and attain to perfect "Deliverance of Mind" and "Deliverance by Wisdom," in all their fullness and depth. Thus the venerable Maha-Moggallana had become one of the Saints. He admitted that he could well say about himself that "Supported by the Master a disciple may obtain the great state of the super-knowledges."[7]

https://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/hecker/wheel263.html

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.