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If so, in how far is it a killer, a quality that harms?

How does it arises, when arising? How does it vanish?

[Note that this isn't given/asked for trade, exchange, stakes or other layziness supporting means but for liberation]

  • There are some topics on this site already, it's more commonly called "sloth" -- buddhism.stackexchange.com/search?q=sloth+is%3Aquestion – ChrisW Mar 2 at 13:12
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    Also I think it's not one of the ten fetters but is one of the five hindrances (so I edited that tag). – ChrisW Mar 2 at 13:12
  • You seemed disappointed that this answer didn't quote the Buddha's words, so I guess you intend this as a "reference request" question (i.e. where the answer is required to include references). And, your using the abhidhamma tag means, I suppose, that you might be looking for references from the abhidhamma and not only from suttas. – ChrisW Mar 2 at 16:35
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Once the Exalted One spoke to the Venerable Maha-Moggallana thus: "Are you drowsy, Moggallana? Are you drowsy, Moggallana?" — "Yes, venerable sir."

(1) "Well then, Moggallana, at whatever thought torpor has befallen you, to that thought you should not give attention, you should not dwell on it frequently. Then it is possible that, by so doing, torpor will disappear......................

AN7.58

https://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/nyanaponika/wheel026.html

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In Buddhism, this is called Sloth and torpor (Thina Middha). The fifth Mara. It arises as a result of the first four Mara is subdued. Buddha has given many ways to overcome this.

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https://dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=35806&p=543234&hilit=

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  • The linked reference or discussion doesn't mention how to overcome it -- it doesn't say anything else about it either -- except that it gives the Pali translation thinamiddha, and the list of all "ten Maras". – ChrisW Mar 2 at 9:05
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Laziness arises due to lack of true knowledge or false knowledge. False knowledge can also demand mental alertness. Laziness is a definite killer. It destroys mental health necessary for liberation. Laziness encourages ignorance. One should be alert all the time if possible even in dreams. One way to kill Laziness is to realize the true knowledge. A person who knows he is going to drown soon if he doesn't mend his ways will definitely try to save himself and become alert of the direction he is going on. He will mindfully change his direction and put himself on the righteous path of mental alertness.

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Laziness is a killer.

For example, if seeing a destination on the other side of a road but are too lazy to look down the road for motor cars, this laziness is a killer.

Or if seeing a destination on the other side of a stream but are too lazy to look into the stream for crocodiles, this laziness is a killer.

Similarly, if reading in DN 1 about "here-&-now" but are too lazy to also read the words "existent being" & "self", laziness leads to thinking "here-&-now" is wrong view rather than "extinct being's self in the here-&-now" is wrong view.

Here, there is wrongly believing "Nibbana here-&-now" is wrong view rather than correctly understanding "self attaining Nibbana in the here-&-now" is wrong view.

Therefore, the mind never overcomes self-view, which the Buddha said was the "killer".

Yet although he was a murderer, the householder or householder's son did not know him as 'my murderer.' And when he encountered him in a solitary place and killed him with a sharp knife: wasn't he even then a murderer? And yet although he was a murderer, the householder or householder's son did not know him as 'my murderer.'"

"Yes, my friend."

"In the same way, an uninstructed, run-of-the-mill person — who has no regard for noble ones, is not well-versed or disciplined in their Dhamma; who has no regard for men of integrity, is not well-versed or disciplined in their Dhamma — assumes form (the body) to be the self, or the self as possessing form, or form as in the self, or the self as in form.

"He assumes feeling to be the self...

"He assumes perception to be the self...

"He assumes (mental) fabrications to be the self...

"He assumes consciousness to be the self, or the self as possessing consciousness, or consciousness as in the self, or the self as in consciousness.

SN 22.85

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  • DN 1 doesn't only warn against self-view. The end of it seems to me to be saying that the Tathagata doesn't attach to the "standpoint" i.e. the "basis of a view" i.e. diṭṭhiṭṭhānā -- by not grasping (misapprehending) even the superior understanding. Also I'm not sure why you think that's related to "laziness". – ChrisW Mar 2 at 11:14
  • The Buddha never said "here & now" is a wrong view. There are countless suttas about here-&-now Dhamma and Nibbana. As for your comment, you are probably misinterpreting the sutta. In fact, it appears you are misreading the sutta. – Dhammadhatu Mar 2 at 11:21
  • A lazy does not know when his head has already been cut off, right? – Samana Johann Mar 9 at 15:35

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