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In Mahasi Sayadaws "Progress of Insight", Chapter 12. Insight Leading to emergence (vutthanagamini-vipassana-ñana), a reference is made to Milindapañha.

Also in the Questions of King Milinda it is said: "His consciousness, while carrying on the practice of bringing to mind (i.e., noticing), passes beyond the continuous occurrence of phenomena and alights upon non-occurrence. One who, having practiced in the correct manner, has alighted upon non-occurrence, O king, is said to have realized Nibbana."

enter image description here Where is this paragraph or its correspondent, in the Milindapañha english translation of Bhikku Pesala?

http://www.aimwell.org/milinda.html

  • Bhante (Ven. Sir) Pesala is active on Dhammawheel and surely best to approach personal and ask respectful there, what does good householder think? – Samana Johann Feb 26 at 12:28
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Venerable Pesala's translation is greatly abridged. We read it recently in our study group and while it's quite good, he leaves out a lot of interesting passages. I recommend if you have time to read the full translation by Rhys-Davids. It is very old, but well done I think. We eventually switched to the Rhys-Davids version to read all the similes at the end.

https://www.sacred-texts.com/bud/milinda.htm

The passage you are looking for is here, I think:

https://www.sacred-texts.com/bud/sbe36/sbe3606.htm

and still to that does he direct his mind again and again, until gone far beyond the transitory, he gains the Real, the highest fruit (of Arahatship). And when he has gained that, O king, the man who has ordered his life aright has realised, (seen face to face,) Nirvâna!'

The entire paragraph:

And in the mind of him who thus perceives the insecurity of transitory life, (of starting afresh ha innumerable births) the thought arises: "All on fire is this endless becoming, burning, and blazing! Full of pain is it, of despair! If only one could reach a state in which there were no becoming, there would there be calm, that would be sweet-the cessation of all these conditions, the getting rid of all these defects (of lusts, of evil, and of Karma), the end of cravings, the absence of passion, peace, Nirvâna!" And therewith does his mind leap forward into that state in which there is no becoming, and then has he found peace, then does he exult and rejoice at the thought: "A refuge have I gained at last!" Just, O king, as a man who, venturing into a strange land, has lost his way, on becoming aware of a path, free from jungle, that will lead him home, bounds forward along it, contented in mind, exulting and rejoicing at the thought: "I have found the way at last!"--just so in him who thus perceives the insecurity of transitory births there arises the thought: "All on fire is this endless becoming, burning, and blazing! Full of pain is it, and despair! If only one could reach a state in which there were no becoming, there would there be calm, that would be sweet-the cessation of all these conditions, the getting rid of all these defects, the end of cravings, the absence of passion, peace, Nirvâna!" And therewith does his mind leap forward into that state in which there is no becoming, and then has he found peace, then does he exult and rejoice at the thought: "A refuge have I found at last!" And he strives with might and main along that path, searches it out, accustoms himself thoroughly to it, to that end does he make firm his self-possession, to that end does he hold fast in effort, to that end does he remain stedfast in love (toward all beings in all the worlds), and still to that does he direct his mind again and again, until gone far beyond the transitory, he gains the Real, the highest fruit (of Arahatship). And when he has gained that, O king, the man who has ordered his life aright has realised, (seen face to face,) Nirvâna!'

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