1

There are 4 aspects of satipatthana meditation. Can anyone explain how to do the cittanupassana? Is it not merelly noting the hate, greed and delusion? Isn't it?.

  • 1
    You might want to check out Thera Soma's great essay on Satipatthana -- The Way of Mindfulness: The Satipatthana Sutta and Its Commentary – santa100 Feb 14 '20 at 15:17
  • If you are lucky Dhammadhatu might chime in & give you an answer. The tetrads aren't practised isolated but they happen sequentially. After the body-mind has been sufficiently calmed, rapture arises. If not clung to it, it calms to sukkha. This basically describes 'body tetrad' because especially rapture is both body-mind related. The more the object of meditation is let go off, the more refined the mind becomes. – Val Feb 14 '20 at 22:32
1

Many people will disagree with my answer because they wish to believe they are practising cittanupassana.

The word "anupassana" means to "watch closely" therefore cittanupassana is not "noting" because noting is thinking rather than watching.

Also, because "anupassana" means to "watch closely", there is no thinking whatsoever in the mind when cittanupassana occurs.

For example, in the practise of Anapanasati, cittanupassana is practised with full concentration, i.e., with knowing each in-breath & each out-breath.

About cittanupassana in Anapanasati, the Buddha commented:

I do not say that there is the development of mindfulness of breathing for one who is forgetful, who is not fully aware.

MN 118

Cittanupassana occurs after the breathing has calmed & after the rapture that arises from calming breathing is also calmed.

Cittanupassana is directly knowing the quality & purity of the mind. Although during cittanupassana the mind can have stains of greed, hatred & delusions, these stains are not thoughts or thinking. They are the energy or mood of the stains/defilements themselves. Therefore, MN 10 says:

And how, monks, does a monk fare along contemplating mind in the mind? Herein, monks, a monk knows intuitively the mind with attachment as a mind with attachment;

he knows intuitively the mind without attachment, as a mind without attachment;

he knows intuitively the mind with hatred, as a mind with hatred;

he knows intuitively the mind without hatred, as a mind without hatred;

he knows intuitively the mind with confusion, as a mind with confusion;

he knows intuitively the mind without confusion, as a mind without confusion;

he knows intuitively the mind that is contracted, as a mind that is contracted;

he knows intuitively the mind that is distracted, as a mind that is distracted;

he knows intuitively the mind that has become great, as a mind that has become great;

he knows intuitively the mind that has not become great, as a mind that has not become great;

he knows intuitively the mind with (some other mental state) superior to it, as a mind with (some other mental state) superior to it;

he knows intuitively the mind with no (other mental state) superior to it, as a mind with no (other mental state) superior to it;

he knows intuitively the mind that is composed, as a mind that is composed;

he knows intuitively the mind that is not composed, as a mind that is not composed;

he knows intuitively the mind that is freed, as a mind that is freed;

he knows intuitively the mind that is not freed, as a mind that is not freed.

MN 10

  • In practice of meditation experience the hate comes with memory and when look into it is as coming from deluted self hatred goes away. Is it correct practice?Now experience shallow breathing during meditation, so meditative object cease very often the look feeling of body it feels as rock. – Buddhika Kitsiri Feb 15 '20 at 13:31
  • As breathing lengthens, immersion deepens. Whatever phenomena are experienced in that immersion are impermanent. Instead of classifying contacts as "self-hatred", etc., simply let go before contact, not after: > MN64:10-12.4: They contemplate the phenomena there as impermanent – OyaMist Feb 15 '20 at 15:36
  • Oya. your comment contradicts my answer. – Dhammadhatu Feb 15 '20 at 21:12
  • 1
    when hate comes with memory, this is called a "hindrance" rather than "cittanupassana'. Even when you "when look into it is as coming from deluted self hatred & it goes away", this "wise reflection" is not "cittanupassana". YES, this "wise reflection" is the correct practice to overcome hindrances. But it is not cittanupassana. Kind regards – Dhammadhatu Feb 15 '20 at 21:14
  • While I was meditating deluted self could not being noticed. I have not meditate for a long time after that happened. Now it just noting the hatred it disappeared soon I noticed. It is not wise reflection. What was it ? – Buddhika Kitsiri Oct 9 '20 at 15:18

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.