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(article link contains all sutta reference passages collected so far) https://notesonthedhamma.blogspot.com/2020/01/all-ebt-sutta-references-to-marana-s.html

excerpt:

All EBT sutta references to maraṇa-s-sati 💀, death-remembering

AN 6.19 and AN 6.20 are really the only two suttas that fully explain the practice of maraṇa-s-sati, and use that name maraṇa-s-sati explicitly. The practice itself though, is a frequent theme in the suttas, but it's not easy to identify and track them all since they're referred to tangentially or indirectly, often not having the word marana anywhere in there at all in those passages.

So here I set out to gather all of those references. Help me complete the collection.

maraṇa-s-sati 💀 = death-remembering ‘appamattā viharissāma, tikkhaṃ maraṇassatiṃ bhāvessāma āsavānaṃ khayāyā’ti. (AN 6.19)

  1. Never forget, remembering to assiduously practice ☸Dharma for arahantship every moment, giving it everything you got, for the time it takes for one breath, or the time it takes to eat one mouthful of food. If you get sidetracked or forget to be assiduous (ap-pamāda), the Buddha calls that negligence (pamāda). (AN 6.19).

  2. Remembering, not forgetting that fatal accidents can strike at any moment, so practice the ☸Dharma assiduously every moment. Doing this correctly, will activate the 7sb☀️ sequence producing virtuous-mirth (mudita/pamojja) and rapture (pīti). (AN 6.20).

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A search for bloated corpses (as used in the effort to preserve) reveals:

SN46.61:1.1: “Mendicants, when the perception of a bloated corpse is developed and cultivated it’s very fruitful and beneficial. …”

AN10.238:1.3: The perceptions of impermanence, not-self, death, repulsiveness of food, dissatisfaction with the whole world, a skeleton, a worm-infested corpse, a livid corpse, a split open corpse, and a bloated corpse.

AN10.57:1.3: The perceptions of impermanence, not-self, death, repulsiveness of food, dissatisfaction with the whole world, a skeleton, a worm-infested corpse, a livid corpse, a split open corpse, and a bloated corpse.

AN4.14:4.2: It’s when a mendicant preserves a meditation subject that’s a fine foundation of immersion: the perception of a skeleton, a worm-infested corpse, a livid corpse, a split open corpse, or a bloated corpse.

AN1.475-484:1.1: They develop the perception of impermanence … the perception of not-self … the perception of death … the perception of the repulsiveness of food … the perception of dissatisfaction with the whole world … the perception of a skeleton … the perception of the worm-infested corpse … the perception of the livid corpse … the perception of the split open corpse … the perception of the bloated corpse …

DN33:1.11.91: It’s when a mendicant preserves a meditation subject that’s a fine foundation of immersion: the perception of a skeleton, a worm-infested corpse, a livid corpse, a split open corpse, or a bloated corpse.

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    The corpse decay practices, are not really marana-sati, as defined in AN 6.19 and 6.20. Maranasati is about remembering that death can strike any moment, and one has to practice assiduously every moment for arahantship. Corpse contemplation certainly could be used to induce maranasati, but its main function is more to deepen insight into impermanence and not self (for how can a self be, if a corpse is dead and impermanent). But thank you for sharing those refs and contributing. – frankk Jan 4 '20 at 17:42

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