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Anyone reaching nirvana in recent years?

People practise buddhism for many years but no one achieves nirvana. No one reaches anātman (pali: anattā). The only theories Buddhism offers are anātman, nirvana, and the five aggregates, so my question is this: Is the Buddha's path corrupt, because no one achieves the goal?

  • I wonder why you suppose nobody reaches the goal, especially as the Buddha tells us we call all do this. I would suggest the question is based on a false premise. . – user14119 Dec 22 '19 at 17:56
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Good question, the popular buddhism is not the correct path to Nivana. That's the simplest answer.

There are many famous teachers (even in this forum) but they haven't achieved Nivana. Most of them have reached some Dhyana but its not aarya (noble) Dhayana. So they have misguided them self by the state of dhyana they have.

Keep looking if you have reasons you will find the correct dhamma. In next 10 years noble dhamma will come out.

With Metta..!

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Since many do not talk about attainments it is difficult to ascertain who has reached Nirvana, but there those who have practised fully would have realised it. This is a conjecture on can reach by taking the 1st few steps one reaches certain milestones in the path.

If you consider more milestones than the final goal itself there would be many more people who have reacht it.

Some milestones one would encounter are as follows:

(Ekādasaka) Cetanā’karaṇīya Sutta

(Ekādasaka) Cetanā’karaṇīya Sutta Introduction by Piya Tan

(Dasaka) Cetanā’karaṇīya Sutta

(Dasaka) Cetanā’karaṇīya Sutta Introduction by Piya Tan

Ones own practise will reveal to you what as further one practices more milestones are reached.

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Unsure of the reasoning behind your question...

Can we simply deduce that, the way to grow a plant is false simply because we couldn't find a plant on the moon?

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Is buddha's paths corrupt?

That's difficult to answer objectively. Are you referring to the path which is:

  • As preserved in the texts?
  • As embodied by successful followers or masters (perhaps aka the "noble" sangha)
  • As embodied by various other people you might point to?
  • As embodied by you?

No one reaches anātman (pali: anattā)

Sorry but I think that has ever been true by definition (and by nature) -- nibbana is anatta, having/being no self.

no one achieves the goal

I think the path itself is worth knowing and practising -- for example to make the cessation of suffering easier or more habitual, and to avoid the causes for its arising.

If the goal is the "greatest good" then the path which leads towards it is, I don't know, "better than nothing" as they say in English?

Complicated or lengthy to explain in detail but there are small realisations maybe like this one which seem to me to be significant:

So the absence of remorse is conditioned, but not being an existing thing, not having been constructed (sankharaed)-- it was the result of not-doing, is not itself subject to ending and is a small taste of Nibbana.

There's more about "the goal" versus "the way to the goal" in the Brahmana Sutta (SN 51.15).

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I know for certain that there is one person who has achieved this lofty state of Nibbana. May I for now call him Ven. Jahn Galt? John Galt is a character in Ayn Rand's novel Atlas Shrugged (1957). Although he is not identified by name in that novel until the last third of the novel, he is the object of its often-repeated question "Who is John Galt?" and of the quest to discover the answer. What is important here for you and I, is that this Ven. ‘Jahn Galt’ who is an Arahant can show you the correct way. For example one correction I will make here. It is not ‘Nirvana’, but ‘Nibbana”.

Nibbana means freed from existential captivity or having existential relationships extinguished. The antonym is samsaric captivity. One who is captive in the circle of raga, dvesha and moha creates own existential relationships for survival and goes adrift. All three binds of captivity are like strings woven together (bāna) causing samsaric existence to continue. Nibbana is the outcome of eradication or uprooting of all three strings of the bāna.

For your next main question, YES, the 'Buddhism' that is known to us in the present day is CORRUPT. It is high time that this corruption is shown as there can be at least one or two of you can then attain Nibbana in this very life.

As expounded by the Buddha, the Buddha Dhamma that discusses the noble path toward the attainment of Nibbana is known as Patichcha Samuppada Dhamma (pati – bond; ichcha – desire; sam – 3 fetters – lobha, dvesha & moha; uppãda – arise). To comprehend the four immovable truths (chatu ariya sachcha), the knowledge of the Patichcha Samuppada Dhamma is indispensable. Gaining of true penetrative wisdom, to grasp the reality of life (or existence) as it is (yathābhuta gñana), is possible only through full comprehension of the four immovable truths. This is not about gaining the full extent of theoretical knowledge or learning but rather, attaining a penetrative deep experience that exceeds the dimensions of conventional wisdom while transforming one’s attitudinal inner view on life/existence.

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  • Nice bro....... – user17101 Dec 21 '19 at 17:08
  • It's a good thing Ayn Rand is dead, or I suspect her head would explode. – Ted Wrigley Dec 21 '19 at 18:20
  • "It is high time that this corruption is shown..." Followed by not explaining what this corruption is or where it can be seen... – Muuski Dec 24 '19 at 15:19
  • @Muuski I think it's saying that the corruption is, "gaining the full extent of theoretical knowledge or learning", instead of the Buddha Dhamma which is, "Gaining of true penetrative wisdom, to grasp the reality of life (or existence) as it is (yathābhuta gñana), ... through full comprehension of the four immovable truths" and "attaining a penetrative deep experience that exceeds the dimensions of conventional wisdom while transforming one’s attitudinal inner view on life/existence". – ChrisW Dec 25 '19 at 21:22
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I have achieved nirvana. But it took me 4 years of practising extreme ascetism. I took cold shower everyday for 2 years and practised semen retention in those 4 years. There comes a day where you think you might lose yourself, your body, your mind. It's hard to unlearn all the wrong teaching of childhood. Once you are in state of jhana you feel some electromagnetic current inside your body. To achieve this sensation you need to practise semen retention and have strong moral codes. Once you go 4th jhana the perception disappears and something else takes place. There's no pleasure but you feel like you are downloading awakening from the universe. After it's completion the truth becomes crystal clear. I cannot explain these things in words because it can be only explained though experience. World, worldy people appears same but your consciousness feels very different. You can't relate to anybody, there's no attachment. In this state of nirvana, all you are is pure consciousness. You will find it yourself. If you want to achieve it then there are only two codes : 1. Very strong moral. 2. Semen retention. Everything else will fall into place itself. Lastly, remember 8 noble fold path is very real in this practise.

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    I’ve been retaining semen for 29 years! How come I’m not enlightened? I know. It’s these damn ovaries again, isn’t it? – user17214 Dec 22 '19 at 3:22

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