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Monkey mind I don't think. I live in present. My mind always thinking. Past thinking

Future thinking.

Hate thought..

Worry thought..

Pleasure thought..

Lust thought..

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Bhante Vimalaramasi talks about this in his talk about MN18 2015 Day 4 Easter Retreat 2 "Perceptions" MN18 - Bhante Vimalaramasi Bhante discusses sutta MN18 from the majjhima nikaya on the subject of Perception. How perception leads to thinking and craving. Proliferations of mind. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1hNpff_JaA

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The nature of the mind is dominated by attachment (greed), aversion (fear), and ignorance(curiosity). There are six mind doors with millions of objects. So the mind is continual scans (attention) these objects with a short span of time. If you can keep your attention on only one object, it is called Jhana. Once you eliminated or suppressed attachment, aversion and ignorance then you can keep your attention on a neutral subject without mind fickle.

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Quoting from Master Junhong Lu's dharma talks -- V 10-9 By Emptying your Mind completely, where do Contaminants settle?:

Don’t let your mind waver, in other words, you mustn’t casually desire for anything you see, as that means you have a wavering mind, and that usually spells trouble. You must understand that if you mind frequently allows itself to get distracted, then it means you don’t have control of it, and it’s easy for you to become defiled. The hardest thing to control is one’s own mind; if you can’t control it, then it’s easy for it to be dragged down by the karmic forces of other sentient beings.

... and ...

Don’t involve yourself too deeply into all matters within the human realm. In other words, don’t be attached to anything in the human realm. If you constantly think that something must be like that, or something must be done by you, then you’ll be contaminated in the world. You must be in a state of emptiness to confront all afflictions. What is the state of emptiness? It’s to empty your mind; it’s not to have any expectations or thoughts about something. It’s to be devoid of hate or love. Nothing is there, and therefore it’s empty. As long as you use the state of emptiness to confront all afflictions, then your afflictions disappear. Your afflictions of today might disappear tomorrow.

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    Both your answers so far link to sites in a vaguely promotional manner. Please review How not to be a spammer. – tripleee Apr 14 at 19:04
  • Thanks, what do you suggest how to post the quotations origin. – Sarah Charlina Apr 14 at 19:17
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    If it really is a quotation, make it clearer through the formatting and add your own commentary to explain why the quotation makes for an answer in this particular situation. – tripleee Apr 14 at 19:24
  • The ideal is, a) include a hyperlimk or reference to what you're quoting b) include a quote from whatever you link to or reference c) format the quote as a quote (using a > as explained here). d) Maybe at least one sentence in your own words to say how the quote answers the OP's question. e) Advertising unrelated to the question (e.g. "Master Junhong Lu is the ambassador for peace in UN and UK in 2014") shouldn't be in the answer but you may include it in your user profile. – ChrisW Apr 15 at 6:42
  • Look here too see how I formatted a quote using >, and a hyperlink using [] and (). You can also ulso use a blank/empty line to separate text into paragraphs. – ChrisW Apr 15 at 8:26
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If you examine nature, much of nature is fickle - volcanoes erupting, winds blowing, clouds forming, earthquakes, rain, flood, drought, etc. Then there are animals programmed to look for food & sex. Then there is growing, aging & passing. People are they same. Unless you believe in god and volitional-self-speculations of reincarnation, all life forms are similar. If you believe in Evolution, you understand you are descended from monkeys, gorillas, baboons and chimpanzees.

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  • Nice example bro – user17101 Nov 15 '19 at 16:27

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