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I had previously asked a question about contempt. Since then, I noticed a few things, such as that it's not easy for me to 'cancel' out analytically my judgment of others. If I try to question my judgment and invalidate it, it often doesn't work, especially if I get angry. I know that my judgments are false, but they still arise.

Are there alternatives to analyzing/questioning the judgment?

The most effective solution so far has been compassion meditation. But that is not always possible in the moment.

What can be done in the moment where judgmental thoughts arise to remain open?

EDIT: I feel perhaps my question is similar to my previous one, but I'm asking for really in the moment remedies, and the diverse options Buddhism recommends.

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Are there alternatives to analyzing/questioning the judgment?

If you look at it as one of many possible interpretations you avoid the risk of invalidating your point of view.

What can be done in the moment where judgmental thoughts arise to remain open?

One possible reason why we need to judge others is because it creates a feeling of righting a wrong, in a sense. Without knowing too much about you, i am assuming that there is some form of painful feeling that creates a clinging to judgment (ditthupadana).

Therefore, one way to aid letting go of judgment is to examine any painful emotions (dukkha) you might have had prior to these thoughts, and try to accept the emotions as they are.

Further, try to look behind other people's actions, to see if there are motives for acting the way they do. What is their dukkha, their tanha or upadana? This can be very hard, but can also yield compassion that ameliorates our clinging to judge others.

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What is thought? You aware your thoughts Trace your thoughts till it's root

Beacuse my observation say that thought is illusion Beacuse thought is memory Memory is thought .

Proof What is nirvana (buddhism) You are thinking not reach this question Because you don't experience. You don't experience. You don't thinking. So your are experience is thought

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What can be done in the moment where judgmental thoughts arise to remain open?

Treat the mind as something from a distance. Tell yourself for example: "The mind tells me" or alternatively, "Anger is arising in me".

If possible, observe any bodily phenomena with a curious attitude. Don't push it away. It's not easy.

If the anger is directed towards others you can reflect how you behaved maybe in a similar way or had similar thoughts.

Otherwise distract yourself for a while.

But whatever you do, it will take some time until the mind changes its state, and from my personal experience, emotions strongly bias subsequent thinking, that's why I recommend to notice anger signals early on to nip them in the bud, but again with an open, allowing & curious attitude.

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I have this problem myself but it is getting better. The first thing I do is to spot the first movement of the mind toward judgment and I send the person metta (May you be well, happy and free from suffering). This then changes my attitude to a more accepting and more opened mind. One other thing which I find helpful is to remember their faults are mine, I have a potential to do what I disapprove and judge. This brings me back to earth and to a forgiving attitude.

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