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Once the 5 precepts is observed from a monk, is there any rupa of sila being formed as a kind of mental factor in the observer? And this rupa of sila (like a vase?) if thus polluted,it can be cleansed, but once broken, it can not be amended. Is this saying correct?

  • Confession is the way to get right of this "rupa", to lift one out of a transgression, householder. Amend does not make deeds undone, will not delete effects, but one is able to walk on and progress. That works for everybody. Monks have special proceedings depending on how heavy the fault, also as a community "law" tool, good householder. – Samana Johann Oct 7 '19 at 11:10
  • It's right, that for a monk, if one of the four basic Silas is gravely broken, that there is no more way to reinstall him in his status as monk. – Samana Johann Oct 7 '19 at 11:13
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The undertaking of the five precepts normally refers to the lay people. While monks also practice them, their discipline is far more numerous and it is called Patimokkha. The five precepts should not be seen the same way as "The Ten Commandments" as they serve as practice guidelines instead of an absolute rule handed down by a supernatural being. If a lay person were to conduct an action against the precepts, there is no penalty or punishment although the action is unwholesome and unskillful. However, it is possible that such an action will result in unpleasant karmic retribution in the future. On the other hand, if a monk were to break one of the rules in the Patimokkha, the offense depends on the seriousness of the unskillful actions.

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  • Monks actually also have "just" four Silas, they are just made more precise. – Samana Johann Oct 7 '19 at 11:11
  • Monks Vinaya rules are over 200. Are you saying that these rules are based on the five precepts? – Adrian Rusli Oct 7 '19 at 18:47
  • I agree, the 200 different rules seem to have the five precepts as the basis; they are made much more specific by the Buddha. – Adrian Rusli Oct 7 '19 at 18:56
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And this rupa of sila (like a vase?) if thus polluted,it can be cleansed, but once broken, it can not be amended. Is this saying correct?

There are a few actions which would be called a monk's "defeat" --

If a bhikkhu commits a paaraajika offence he is 'defeated' and no longer a bhikkhu even if he is wearing robes. The Community of bhikkhus will have nothing to do with him and will expel him.

The Bhikkhus' Rules -- A Guide for Laypeople

A less-serious offence has lesser consequences -- i.e. it might be cleansed or amended.

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