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I am reading SN 36.22, which says:

And what, bhikkhus, are the thirty-six kinds of feelings? Six types of joy based on the household life, six types of joy based on renunciation; six types of displeasure based on the household life, six types of displeasure based on renunciation; six types of equanimity based on the household life, six types of equanimity based on renunciation. These are called the thirty-six kinds of feelings. “And what, bhikkhus, are the hundred and eight kinds of feelings? The above thirty-six feelings in the past, the above thirty-six feelings in the future, the above thirty-six feelings at present. These are called the hundred and eight kinds of feelings.

What are the six types of equanimity based on the household life?

  • It's described in the Sutta: based on the six kinds of senses there are six kinds, in the case it's missed in the Sutta. But good that householder investigates this matter. – Samana Johann Jul 13 '19 at 8:08
  • Is this a duplicate of buddhism.stackexchange.com/questions/25046/… – Andrei Volkov Jul 13 '19 at 8:51
  • This thread contains the right answer for me. The "duplicate thread" does not. – Dhammadhatu Jul 13 '19 at 9:11
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(E) Therein, what are the 6 kinds of equanimity of the household life (cha gehasitā upekkhā)?

(25) On seeing a form with the eye, equanimity arises in a foolish, confused, worlding, in an untutored worldling who has not conquered his limitations nor conquered his karmic fruits, who sees not danger. Such an equanimity as this does not transcend form. Therefore, it is called the equanimity of the household life.

(26) On hearing a sound with the ear, equanimity arises in a foolish, confused, worlding, in an untutored worldling who has not conquered his limitations nor conquered his karmic fruits, who sees not danger. Such an equanimity as this does not transcend sound. Therefore, it is called the equanimity of the household life.

(27) On smelling a smell with the nose, equanimity arises in a foolish, confused, worlding, in an untutored worldling who has not conquered his limitations nor conquered his karmic fruits, who sees not danger. Such an equanimity as this does not transcend smell. Therefore, it is called the equanimity of the household life.

(28) On tasting a taste with the tongue, equanimity arises in a foolish, confused, worlding, in an untutored worldling who has not conquered his limitations nor conquered his karmic fruits, who sees not danger. Such an equanimity as this does not transcend taste. Therefore, it is called the equanimity of the household life.

(29) On feeling a touch with the body, equanimity arises in a foolish, confused, worlding, in an untutored worldling who has not conquered his limitations nor conquered his karmic fruits, who sees not danger. Such an equanimity as this does not transcend touch. Therefore, it is called the equanimity of the household life.

(30) On cognizing a mind-object with the mind, equanimity arises in a foolish, confused, worlding, in an untutored worldling who has not conquered his limitations nor conquered his karmic fruits, who sees not danger. Such an equanimity as this does not transcend mind-object. Therefore, it is called the equanimity of the household life.

These are the 6 kinds of equanimity of the household life.

Sal,āyatana Vibhanga Sutta

(1) the latent tendency to lust reinforced by being attached to pleasant feelings;

(2) the latent tendency to aversion reinforced by rejecting painful feelings;

(3) the latent tendency to ignorance reinforced by ignoring neutral feelings

Pahāna Sutta

So the neutral feeling or equanimous feeling experienced, in the case of a householder leads to ignorance. The equanimity, in this case, is not been non-judgemental.

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  • So the neutral feeling in the case of a householder leads to ignorance. yes, but also for a recluse if not really renounced the world. – Samana Johann Jul 13 '19 at 9:39
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It's described in the Sutta: based on the six kinds of senses there are six kinds (of the three vedanas, here equanimity), in the case it's missed in the Sutta. But good that householder investigates this matter.

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